Violence

On today's ST, we are discussing a new book on race relations and American history that offers a bold, thorough, and eye-opening critique of our nation's criminal justice apparatus, its police operations, and indeed its entire legal system. Our guest is the well-regarded historian Elizabeth Hinton, who is an associate professor of history and African American studies at Yale University as well as a professor of law at Yale Law School.

Yes, the nation is deeply, counter-productively divided -- and yes, American politics and American culture probably haven't been this divided in decades.... But what can we DO about such polarization? Our guest is Peter T. Coleman, a professor of psychology and education at Columbia University, where he holds a joint appointment at Teachers College and the Earth Institute.

Library of Congress (American National Red Cross Photograph Collection)

The Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921 injured souls, claimed lives, ruined property, and demolished an entire community. Indeed, the damage suffered by the Black citizens of Greenwood took on many forms -- and this suffering went on for decades. Is it possible even to calculate the economic loss that Greenwood endured due to this terrible tragedy, and if so, how could such a tally be arrived at? As the centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre approaches, many are wondering about these questions. Our guest is Jason Long, an economic historian at Wheaton College.

On this edition of ST, we are discussing a book that first appeared as a small, privately-printed volume back in 1923 -- it's an extremely important, frequently cited, and quite special book in that it offers a rare, first-hand account of the Tulsa Race Massacre. Written by one Mary Parrish, a journalist and teacher, the book is "The Nation Must Awake: My Witness to the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921." In the opening pages of the text, we learn that Parrish was reading in her home in Tulsa's Greenwood neighborhood when the massacre began on the evening of May 31, 1921.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we listen back our discussion from 1997 with the bestselling author and educator Jewell Parker Rhodes. At that time, we spoke with Rhodes about her then-new novel, "Magic City." This book was among the first works of published fiction to depict the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. A memorable and well-crafted novel of racism, vigilantism, and injustice, "Magic City" is now appearing in a new edition that includes a recently-composed afterword from by author.

(Note: This interview first aired in September of 2020.) Our guest is Rachel Louise Snyder, an award-winning journalist and professor of creative writing and journalism at American University. She talks about her latest book, which is "No Visible Bruises: What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us." As was noted of this widely-acclaimed study by The Washington Post: "Compulsively readable.... In a writing style that's as gripping as good fiction, as intimate as memoir, and deeply informed, [Snyder] takes us into the lives of the abused, the abusers, and the survivors....

AJC.org

Anyone who's followed current events for the past several years -- here in the U.S. and/or across the globe -- will recognize that violent acts of antisemitism are on the rise. Why is this happening? Our guest is Holly Huffnagle, the U.S. Director for Combating Antisemitism at the American Jewish Committee (or AJC). She joins us to preview a free, upcoming, online talk that she'll deliver on the Zoom platform.

(Note: This interview first aired back in May.) Our guest is Walter Johnson, the Winthrop Professor of History and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. His new book is a far-reaching, unflinching, and complicated account of race relations in his hometown: St. Louis, Missouri. From Lewis and Clark's 1804 expedition to the 2014 uprising in Ferguson, the course of American events, Johnson argues, has been charted in St. Louis.

The organization known as MS-13 -- often in the headlines, especially since they've been repeatedly referred to by President Trump -- is thought to have approximately ten thousand members located in dozens of states across the US, and it's routinely linked to thousands of murders each year in this country and abroad. But MS-13 is also widely misunderstood, as we learn on today's ST.

Our guest is Rachel Louise Snyder, an award-winning journalist and professor of creative writing and journalism at American University. She talks about her newest book, which is just out in paperback; the book is "No Visible Bruises: What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us." As was noted of this widely-acclaimed study by The Washington Post: "Compulsively readable.... In a writing style that's as gripping as good fiction, as intimate as memoir, and deeply informed, [Snyder] takes us into the lives of the abused, the abusers, and the survivors....

Our guest is Walter Johnson, the Winthrop Professor of History and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. His new book is a far-reaching, unflinching, and complicated account of race relations in his hometown: St. Louis, Missouri. From Lewis and Clark's 1804 expedition to the 2014 uprising in Ferguson, the course of American events, Johnson argues, has been charted in St. Louis. His book moreover shows how the imperialism, racism, and capitalism that have defined the city have likewise defined our nation's history.

KWGS

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — A 3-year-old boy suffered a life-threatening wound after he was shot Tuesday at a Oklahoma residence, authorities said.

Sheriff Scott Walton said the child’s condition is unknown, but he will have his second surgery Wednesday.

Keven Her, the child’s uncle, called 911, according to a probable cause affidavit. He told dispatchers that a 3-year-old had been shot by a 9mm pistol.

On this edition of Found@TU, which is our monthly interview podcast series in which University of Tulsa faculty discuss their research and why it matters, our guest is Dr. Elana Newman. She is the McFarlin Professor of Psychology and Research Director of the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma, and she joins us to discuss her in-depth research on journalism and trauma. Dr.

Our guest is Elliot Ackerman, the author of several widely-acclaimed novels who's also a former Marine; he served five tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, where he received the Silver Star, the Bronze Star for Valor, and the Purple Heart. Ackerman joins us to discuss his new book, a collection of autobiographical essays called "Places and Names: On War, Revolution, and Returning." Per a starred review of this volume in Booklist: "[A] searing, contemplative, and unforgettable memoir-in-essays....

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Judy Melinek, a board-certified forensic pathologist practicing forensic medicine in California's Bay Area, where she is also the CEO of PathologyExpert, Inc. Lately, Dr.

Our guest on this installment of StudioTulsa is Brenda Tracy, a registered nurse who's based in Oregon. Tracy speaks often about sexual assault and physical violence on America's college campuses. In 1998, while she was a student at Oregon State, she was gang raped by four men -- two of whom were Oregon State football players. For many years afterward, as we learn on today's show, Tracy did not speak publicly about this devastating personal tragedy.

(Note: This show first aired back in February.) On this edition of our show, a discussion with Sue Klebold, whose 17-year-old son, Dylan, was of course one of the two teenage boys who committed suicide ­after their murderous attack on Colorado's Columbine High School in 1999. Klebold has a new book out about this incident -- and more to the point, about the behaviors that she did and did not see in her son in the months and years leading up to that terrible April day.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about the nonprofit Family Safety Center, which is located in the basement of the downtown Tulsa Police Station.

On this edition of our show, a discussion with Sue Klebold, whose 17-year-old son, Dylan, was of course one of the two teenage boys who committed suicide ­after their murderous attack on Colorado's Columbine High School in 1999. Klebold has a new book out about this incident -- and more to the point, about the behaviors that she did and did not see in her son in the months and years leading up to that terrible April day.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in August.) How do ideas about personal honor and/or reputation shape our lives and relationships? How do they affect American society as a whole? And how have they helped to shape our history as a nation? On this edition of our show, we speak with Ryan P. Brown, a professor of social psychology at The University of Oklahoma.

On this installment of ST, we speak with author Norm Stamper, who was a police officer for more than 30 years, first in San Diego and then in Seattle, where he retired as that city's police chief. He is widely credited as the architect of the nation's first community policing program and served as a founding member of President Bill Clinton's National Advisory Council on the Violence Against Women Act.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Lawrence Aber, the Willner Family Professor of Psychology and Public Policy at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University, where he is also a University Professor. Dr. Aber is an internationally respected expert on child development, poverty, psychology, and how all of these relate to social policy.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the well-regarded author, essayist, and cultural critic Chuck Klosterman, who has published a number of books and also writes the weekly "Ethicist" column for The New York Times Magazine. Klosterman's latest title, "I Wear the Black Hat: Grappling with Villains (Real and Imagined)," is just out in paperback; it's a far-reaching, often funny, and highly entertaining exploration of why we as a society are so attracted to -- yet also, of course, repelled by -- villains both fictional and nonfictional...as well as the very notion of villainy itself.