War in Afghanistan

CAIR Oklahoma

The first Afghan refugees arrived in Oklahoma this week, touching down in Oklahoma City late Wednesday.

"We are exceedingly proud to welcome some new neighbors!" Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City, the refugee resettlement agency, wrote on social media following the arrival of the family of seven.

U.S. Department of State

The Oklahoma Republican Party on Tuesday again urged followers to mount a pressure campaign on fellow Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt to oppose the resettlement of Afghan refugees in Oklahoma. 

Chairman John Bennett said in a Facebook video that he does not believe the federal government has properly vetted Afghans fleeing the Taliban who are being brought to the United States, despite the State Department's insistence to the contrary.

U.S. Department of State

Catholic Charities of Eastern Oklahoma is preparing to welcome and help resettle hundreds of Afghan refugees in Tulsa in the coming weeks and months, with the first arrivals possible within the coming days.

"We'll be welcoming those families very soon into our community," said Deacon Kevin Sartorius. He said they expect roughly 200 families for a total of about 800 individuals.

Each of the families has at least one member who aided the U.S. mission during the war in Afghanistan, Sartorius said, and all have been vetted and approved by the State Department.

Oklahoma Republican Party

The Oklahoma Republican Party on Saturday said the state should not welcome Afghan refugees fleeing Taliban rule following the U.S. military withdrawal from Afghanistan.

In a video posted to the party's Facebook page, party chair John Bennett called on Oklahomans to speak up about the fact that they are anti-refugee.

"I encourage you to call and email the governor, call and email your legislators, and tell them: Do not allow Afghan refugees into Oklahoma," said Bennett, who, in addition to leading the state GOP, is also an Assembly of God preacher at a church in Muldrow. 

On this edition of ST, we are discussing the history of the War on Terror -- i.e., the open-ended, multi-directional conflict that the U.S. government enacted some twenty years ago, in the immediate wake of 9/11 -- as well as how this war has moved both American politics and American society in increasingly authoritarian (and even racist) directions. Our guest is Spencer Ackerman, a national-security correspondent who's written for The New Republic, WIRED, The Guardian, and The Daily Beast.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in August.) Robert Draper is our guest; he is a writer at large for The New York Times Magazine and a contributing writer to National Geographic. His past books include the bestselling "Dead Certain: The Presidency of George W.

PHOTO BY CNN.COM

Our guest is Dr. Joshua Landis, Director of the Center for Middle East Studies and Professor at the University of Oklahoma's College of International Studies. He recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (or TCFR) titled "The U.S. and the Middle East: Making Sense of Oil, Regime Change, and Forever Wars." Dr. Landis also writes "Syria Comment," a daily newsletter on Syrian politics that attracts 100,000 readers per month -- and he often consults with U.S.

Our guest is Elliot Ackerman, the author of several widely-acclaimed novels who's also a former Marine; he served five tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, where he received the Silver Star, the Bronze Star for Valor, and the Purple Heart. Ackerman joins us to discuss his new book, a collection of autobiographical essays called "Places and Names: On War, Revolution, and Returning." Per a starred review of this volume in Booklist: "[A] searing, contemplative, and unforgettable memoir-in-essays....

Has the long-standing, bi-partisan, and rather rarified U.S. foreign policy establishment effectively failed our country? Yes, according to our guest today: Stephen M. Walt is a Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He previously taught at Princeton and the University of Chicago, and he's now a contributing editor at Foreign Policy magazine. Walt's latest book is "The Hell of Good Intentions: America's Foreign Policy Elite and the Decline of U.S.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Ambassador Husain Haqqani, who served as Pakistan's ambassador to the United States from 2008 to 2011. Now working as a Hudson Institute Senior Fellow, where he is also the Director for South and Central Asia, Haqqani is widely credited with managing a difficult American-Pakistani partnership during a critical phase in the global war on terrorism. He has, moreover, served as an advisor to four different Pakistani Prime Ministers; he is also co-editor of the journal Current Trends in Islamist Ideology.

President Trump recently announced a new approach -- a new strategy, basically -- for the U.S. Military in Afghanistan. How will this play out? Our guest on this installment of ST is Omar Samad, the former Afghan Ambassador to France (2009-11) and Canada (2004-09). Now working as a consultant in Virginia, Ambassador Samad has also been a Senior Afghan Expert at the United States Institute of Peace (2012-2013) as well as a Senior Central Asia Fellow at the New America Foundation (2013-14).

"Into the Sun: A Novel"

Oct 24, 2016

Our guest on this edition of ST is Deni Ellis Béchard, whose previous books includethe novel "Vandal Love" and the memoir "Cures for Hunger." He joins us to discuss his new book, a novel called "Into the Sun." This book explores, as a critic for Kirkus Reviews noted, "how living in Afghanistan profoundly affected a group of friends.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak by phone with John Kael Weston, who represented the United States for more than a decade as a State Department official. Weston has a new book out -- part memoir, part critique, part military history, and part geo-political reportage -- which he discusses with us today. It's called  "The Mirror Test: America at War in Iraq and Afghanistan." As was noted by The Washington Post: "As a former Foreign Service officer, Weston is perfectly positioned to provide a different perspective on these wars' sometimes-particular complexities....

On this installment of ST, on the eve of the Fourth of July, we replay an interview from last year with the Denver-based journalist and nonfiction author Helen Thorpe, whose writing has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Texas Monthly, and elsewhere. Thorpe's first book, 2009's widely acclaimed "Just Like Us," tellingly profiled the lives of three young Latinas living in the United States.

On this edition of ST, we offer an interesting interview with John M. Kinder, an assistant professor of American studies and history at Oklahoma State University.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Lynsey Addario, an award-winning American photojournalist whose work appears regularly in The New York Times, National Geographic, and Time magazine. Having covered conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq, Darfur, the Congo, Haiti, and elsewhere, Addario is also the author of a well-regarded new autobiography, "It's What I Do: A Photographer's Life of Love and War," which Publishers Weekly has called "a highly readable and thoroughly engaging memoir....

Our guest on StudioTulsa is the noted Denver-based journalist and nonfiction author Helen Thorpe, whose writing has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Texas Monthly, and elsewhere. Thorpe's first book, 2009's widely acclaimed "Just Like Us," tellingly profiled the lives of three young Latinas living in the United States. Her newly published second book, "Soldier Girls: The Battles of Three Women at Home and at War," takes a close look at three female veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

Fallen Claremore Soldier Comes Home to Be Laid to Rest

Sep 27, 2012
KWGS News

Patriot Guard motorcycle riders escort the body of Army PFC Jon Townsend, killed earlier this month in Afghanistan. The procession travels from Tulsa International Airport to Claremore, Townsend’s home town, and where his funeral will be held. Lining the route are people waving flags…one of them is Sgt. 1st Class Chad Broughton with the Oklahoma National Guard. He says he’s been deployed overseas three times, and it’s always tough to see a young soldier like Townsend die in the war. He says he came to the airport to show respect for Townsend and his family.

Service Set for Claremore Soldier Killed in Afghanistan

Sep 26, 2012
DOD

CLAREMORE, Okla. (AP) — A funeral service is scheduled for a 19-year-old soldier from Claremore who was killed in an "insider" attack by police in Afghanistan.

Services with military honors are set for 10 a.m. Friday for Army Pfc. Jon Townsend, who was killed on Sept. 16.

The ceremony will be at First Baptist Church in Claremore. Rice Funeral Service is in charge of arrangements. A visitation will be held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday at the funeral home.