Water Conservation

(Note: This interview originally aired back in August.) Our guest is Marcus Eriksen, a naturalist, author, and environmental activist whose latest book -- "Junk Raft" -- details his 2008 sea voyage on a craft made from plastic bottles and other recycled materials; it's a trek he made in order to demonstrate the blight of plastic waste in the world’s oceans.

What's it like to live on one-tenth of the fossil-fuel consumption of the average American? Alarmed by the drastic changes now occurring in the Earth's climate systems, our guest on today's ST -- who is a climate scientist and father of two -- decided to find out. And he's very glad he did. Peter Kalmus is our guest; he is an atmospheric scientist at Caltech / Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and he has a new book out. As he announces in this book, he eventually made a decision to change both his life and the world...and in both cases, for the better.

Our guest is Marcus Eriksen, a naturalist, author, and environmental activist whose latest book -- "Junk Raft" -- details his 2008 sea voyage on a craft made from plastic bottles and other recycled materials; it's a trek he made in order to demonstrate the blight of plastic waste in the world’s oceans.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Corey Williams, the executive director of the nonprofit Sustainable Tulsa, which is driven by (as noted at its website) these core principles: "A thriving society, responsible economic growth, and environmental stewardship...[which] are the mutually reinforcing pillars of sustainability." Ms. Williams tells us about Sustainable Tulsa's next First Thursday presentation, which is a free event happening tomorrow (the 6th) at the TCC Center for Creativity (near 10th and Boston in downtown Tulsa).

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we offer an interesting discussion about water conservation and related subjects with Noah Roberts, the proprietor of a recently opened shop in downtown Tulsa called The Water Co. This business sells water-bottle filling stations as well as reusable bottles, cups, and straws. And it does so, as noted on its website, in order to "improve community health and habitat by providing drinking water systems and reusable drinkware as an alternative to single-serve plastic bottles and cups.