water quality

On this edition of ST, we learn about how homeowners in the Greater Tulsa area can take simple steps -- in both their lawncare and their gardening practices -- to improve and preserve the quality of our local water, land, and ecology. The Yard By Yard Community Resiliency Project is an initiative of the Oklahoma Conservation Commission; the project started in OKC and is now happening in Tulsa.

U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee

A top official at the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality testified before a U.S. Senate committee Wednesday that climate change threatens water system infrastructure across the country. 

Courtesy

The City of Broken Arrow has donated land to help keep tabs on groundwater quality in the state.

A new well at the Verdigris Water Treatment Plant will be added to the statewide Groundwater Monitoring and Assessment Program, a network of around 750 wells established in 2012. Oklahoma Water Resources Board Water Programs Division Manager Bill Cauthron said there’s a distinct advantage to working with local governments.

(Please note: This interview originally aired back in September.) It's scary, but by now it's also obvious -- our environment today contains thousands (literally, thousands) of toxic chemicals that it did NOT contain just a few decades ago. How are these chemicals affecting our health? And what can we do about this? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the co-author of a new book called "Non-Toxic: Guide to Living Healthy in a Chemical World." Dr.

It's scary, but by now it's also obvious -- our environment today contains thousands (literally, thousands) of toxic chemicals that it did NOT contain just a few decades ago. How are these chemicals affecting our health? And what can we, as individuals, do about this? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the co-author of a new book called "Non-Toxic: Guide to Living Healthy in a Chemical World." Dr. Aly Cohen is a board certified rheumatologist and integrative medicine specialist, as well as an environmental health expert based in Princeton, New Jersey.

We welcome to our show Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, a physician, epidemiologist, public health expert, and progressive activist. He was appointed health director of Detroit, Michigan, at age 30, and he was formerly a professor at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Dr. El-Sayed's new book, which he tells us about, is "Healing Politics: A Doctor's Journey into the Heart of Our Political Epidemic." As was noted of this book by Bill McKibben with 350.org: "This is a very important book.

Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality

The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality is warning that there may be more health hazards in reopening businesses than just the coronavirus.

The department has issued guidelines for businesses that have been closed, or even just using less water than usual, due to the pandemic, urging them to flush taps to avoid using water that may have been tainted by corrosion or bacteria, like the kind that could cause Legionnaire's Disease.

It's easy to take safe drinking water for granted, but so very much of public health stems from having it (that is, having lots of it) on hand. Moreoever, the problems that've recently affected Flint, Michigan -- and other communities -- have brought the whole potable-water issue to the forefront for many Americans. Where does Tulsa's drinking water come from, and how does it get here? How safe is it, and how clean or "pure" is it? And how do we know these things? How is our water monitored? And how often?

(Note: This interview originally aired back in August.) Our guest is Marcus Eriksen, a naturalist, author, and environmental activist whose latest book -- "Junk Raft" -- details his 2008 sea voyage on a craft made from plastic bottles and other recycled materials; it's a trek he made in order to demonstrate the blight of plastic waste in the world’s oceans.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we offer an interesting discussion about water conservation and related subjects with Noah Roberts, the proprietor of a recently opened shop in downtown Tulsa called The Water Co. This business sells water-bottle filling stations as well as reusable bottles, cups, and straws. And it does so, as noted on its website, in order to "improve community health and habitat by providing drinking water systems and reusable drinkware as an alternative to single-serve plastic bottles and cups.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Sandra Postel, a well-respected expert on freshwater conservation who's also the founder of the Global Water Policy Project. She co-created Change the Course, a national freshwater conservation and restoration campaign, and in 2010, she was appointed a Freshwater Fellow of the National Geographic Society, where she still serves as the Society's leading water expert.

Tulsa Water Quality Report Headed Your Way

Jun 5, 2012

Each year the City of Tulsa’s Water & Sewer Department mails to all of its water customers the annual water quality report which is required under the provisions of the federal 1996 Safe Drinking Water Act and its amendments.  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requires community water systems to provide customers with a “Consumer Confidence Report” each year.