Widespread Disasters and Catastrophic Events

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the physician, regular CNBC contributor, and former FDA Commissioner, Scott Gottlieb. His new book explains how the coronavirus and its variants were able to effectively demolish America's pandemic protocols and preparations. "Uncontrolled Spread" also outlines the steps that Gottlieb says must be taken in order to safeguard against the next outbreak. As was noted of this work by Kirkus Reviews: "The author...urges that preparation for pandemics be considered a part of national security.... These and other measures are urgently needed....

Our guest is Adam Tooze, a professor of history at Columbia University and the author of "Crashed," which was a New York Times Notable Book of 2018 and one of The Economist's Books of the Year. His timely new book, which he tells us about, mixes finance, politics, business, economics, medicine, and recent world history in order to trace what went wrong -- and why -- during the turning-point year that was 2020. This new book is "Shutdown: How Covid Shook the World's Economy." As was noted by Reuters: "Tooze makes a strong case for looking back and beginning to draw some conclusions....

Kris Grogan / U.S. Customs and Border Protection

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr Samantha Montano, a specialist on emergency management, and a professor at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy about her new book, "Disasterology: Dispatches from the Frontlines of the Climate Crisis." Although emergency management vowed 'never again' after the mistakes in the response to Hurricane Katrina (Montano's first disaster experience), recent experiences after Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico and subsequent hurricanes along the Gulf Coast, lead Montano and other emergency management professionals to think that the next catastrophic disa

The well-regarded historian Niall Ferguson is our guest; his many books include "Civilization," "The Great Degeneration," and "The Ascent of Money." He joins us to discuss his newest book, "Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe," which seems especially timely in the wake of the annus horribilis that was 2020. Ferguson's book sets out to show why human beings are getting worse, not better, at handling disasters -- despite advancements in medicine, science, technology, etc.