Wildlife Conservation and Preservation

On this edition of ST, we learn about a free-to-the-public event happening tomorrow (Saturday the 22nd) at the Turkey Mountain Urban Wilderness Area in Tulsa (at 6850 South Elwood Avenue). Tulsa's River Parks Authority will present "Monarchs on the Mountain," a festival celebrating the vital role that Eastern Oklahoma plays in the Great Monarch Butterfly Migration, every autumn, from Canada to Mexico.

Our guest is Roger Thompson, a Tulsa native and nonfiction writer who also directs the Program in Writing and Rhetoric at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Formerly, Thompson was a wilderness canoe guide in Minnesota; later on, he founded an environmental program in Banff, Alberta, Canada. His newest book, which he told us about recently while visiting Tulsa, grew directly out his longtime appreciation of outdoor exploration.

The Tulsa Zoo's popular Conservation On Tap event will happen soon. It's a sold-out gathering, a fundraiser from which all profits will go toward saving chinchillas in the wild. We learn about these important, furry, and quite threatened creatures -- their habitat, habits, history, etc. -- on today's StudioTulsa.

If you grew up here in the Sooner State -- and if you are, as they say, of a certain age -- then you might well wonder where all the Texas horned lizards, or horned toads, or horny toads, have gone.... Whatever you call them, they used to be readily apparent all over these parts, or so it seemed -- but no longer. What happened? Our guest is Chad Love, a freelance writer and editor based in Woodward, Oklahoma.

Our guest is Marcus Eriksen, a naturalist, author, and environmental activist whose latest book -- "Junk Raft" -- details his 2008 sea voyage on a craft made from plastic bottles and other recycled materials; it's a trek he made in order to demonstrate the blight of plastic waste in the world’s oceans.

On this installment of ST, we are discussing State Question 777, the so-called "Right to Farm" proposal, which voters statewide will decide on come November. As was noted recently in a Tulsa World editorial: "Both sides in the debate over State Question 777...have been guilty of excesses in their arguments. The proponents have suggested that only a state constitutional measure could shield cherished rural values of decent working farmers from the meddling hands of bureaucrats and lunatic eco-extremists.

(Note: This program originally aired back in April.) Late one night in 2011, a large animal collided with an SUV on a Connecticut parkway. This animal was not a deer -- as is, sadly, so often the case. It was a 140-pound mountain lion...and it had been born in the Black Hills of South Dakota...in 2009!

On this installment of ST, we speak with the corporate lawyer, conservation leader, and author Frederic C. Rich. His new book, just out, is called "Getting to Green" -- it argues for a new bipartisan coalition in American politics and culture in order to fix the ongoing (and basically nonfunctioning) mess that is the current Green Movement in the US.

There are six waterways in eastern Oklahoma that are considered so environmentally and economically significant they're given special consideration and protection from the state. These so-called Scenic Rivers were profiled in a special half-hour radio doc created by StateImpact reporters Joe Wertz and Logan Layden in 2014. This doc was originally aired as a four-part radio series, and we are pleased to re-broadcast it today on StudioTulsa.

Late one night in 2011, a large animal collided with an SUV on a Connecticut parkway. This animal was not a deer -- as is, sadly, so often the case. It was a 140-pound mountain lion...and it had been born in the Black Hills of South Dakota...in 2009!

Our guest on this edition of ST is Sandra Postel, a well-respected expert on freshwater conservation who's also the founder of the Global Water Policy Project. She co-created Change the Course, a national freshwater conservation and restoration campaign, and in 2010, she was appointed a Freshwater Fellow of the National Geographic Society, where she still serves as the Society's leading water expert.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in January.) On this installment of ST, we speak by phone with Anthony Barnosky, a Professor of Integrated Biology at UC-Berkeley and a leading scientist specializing on how global change affects biodiversity and ecosystem function.

On this installment of ST, a fascinating discussion with the Tennessee-based storyteller and performer Jim Pfitzer, who will soon appear onstage in Tulsa in "A Standard of Change," the one-man play that he created about the life and work of Aldo Leopold (1887-1948). An influential American author, scientist, ecologist, forester, and conservationist, Leopold -- the "father of wildlife biology," as some have called him -- is probably best known as the author of "A Sand County Almanac," which is a literary classic that's especially popular with environmentalist readers.

Tomorrow afternoon and evening -- on Tuesday the 18th, at the Tulsa Garden Center, from 1pm till 9:15pm -- the Tulsa Audubon Society, in collaboration with WING IT (as in "Wildlife In Need Group -- In Tulsa") and Wild Birds Unlimited, will present the second annual Wild at Art festival.