Women in History

Image via KQED.org (Photo by Gary Sexton)

On the occasion of her first-ever career retrospective, we speak with the legendary artist and feminist, Judy Chicago (born 1939). "Judy Chicago: A Retrospective," now on view at San Francisco's de Young Museum, includes about 130 paintings, prints, drawings, and ceramic sculptures, in addition to ephemera, several films, and a documentary. We also talk about Chicago's smoke sculptures. What is a smoke sculpture? We'll get to that.

(Note: This interview first aired back in June.) When the documentary film "Period. End of Sentence." won an Oscar in 2019, the film's co-producer, Melissa Berton, said in her acceptance speech: "A period should end a sentence, not a girl's education." Now comes a book that follows-up on that goundbreaking movie, a far-reaching work that outlines the challenges confronting those who menstruate worldwide and the solutions being offered by a new generation of body-positive activists and innovators. Our guest is the author of this work, Anita Diamant.

On this edition of ST, we welcome writer Connie Cronley back to our program. She's one of our regular commentators; her previous books include "Sometimes a Wheel Falls Off," "Light and Variable," "Poke a Stick at It," and "Mr. Ambassador: Warrior for Peace." Cronley joins us to discuss her latest book, "A Life on Fire," which is a fascinating new biography of Kate Barnard (1875-1930).

(Note: This discussion first aired back in March.) Our guest is Dorothy Wickenden, an author and editor at The New Yorker Magazine. She tells us about her new book, which explores various interlinked facets of American history, including abolition, the Underground Railroad, the early women's rights movement, and the Civil War. As the noted Yale historian David W. Blight has written of this book: "As a revolutionary, Harriet Tubman made many allies, none more important than her Auburn, New York, neighbors Martha Wright and Frances Seward.

On this edition of ST, our guest is the journalist and author Lisa Napoli, who joins to discuss her latest book, "Susan, Linda, Nina, & Cokie: The Extraordinary Story of the Founding Mothers of NPR." It's a group biography of Susan Stamberg, Linda Wertheimer, Nina Totenberg, and Cokie Roberts: four women who fought sexism, challenged journalistic norms, covered decades of American and worldwide news, and did much more throughout their pioneering careers to build and establish National Public Radio.

When the documentary film "Period. End of Sentence." won an Oscar in 2019, the film's co-producer, Melissa Berton, said in her acceptance speech: "A period should end a sentence, not a girl's education." Now comes a new book that follows-up on that goundbreaking movie, a far-reaching book that outlines the challenges confronting those who menstruate worldwide and the solutions being offered by a new generation of body-positive activists and innovators. Our guest is the author of this work, Anita Diamant.

Our guest is Suzanne Koven, a primary care physician and the inaugural writer-in-residence at Massachusetts General Hospital; she is also a member of the faculty at Harvard Medical School. Koven joins us to discuss her new memoir, "Letter to a Young Female Physician." It's a work that, as the writer Andrew Solomon has noted, "charts both the real and the spurious demands that the medical system makes on those who become doctors and care for us all. [Koven's] memoir is by turns reassuring and disturbing, comical and tragic, hopeful and dire.

Photo via jewishpartisans.org

Next week, on Thursday the 22nd at 7pm, the Tulsa Council for Holocaust Education and the Tulsa City-County Library will co-present the 23rd Annual Yom HaShoah Interfaith Commemoration.

Our guest is Olivia Campbell, a journalist specializing in medicine and women who has written for The Guardian, The Washington Post, New York Magazine, and several other publications. Her first book is just out, and she joins us on ST Medical Monday to discuss it. "Women in White Coats: How the First Women Doctors Changed the World of Medicine" tells how three remarkable Victorian women broke down all sorts of barriers in order to become the first women doctors, thereby eventually revolutionizing the way all women receive health care.