Women's Rights

Our guest is Anita Hill, the University Professor of Social Policy, Law, and Women's and Gender Studies at Brandeis University. Following her historic testimony at the 1991 Senate confirmation hearings for U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, Hill became a leading national figure in the fight for women's rights and against gender-based violence. She joins us to talk about her new book, "Believing." As was noted of this work in a starred review in Library Journal: "Hill's new book defies boundaries by bringing together elements of memoir with law, social analysis, and polemic....

Photo from office of Gov. Greg Abbott

On Sep. 1, Texas banned abortion after about six weeks of pregnancy. Oklahoma is already seeing an uptick in women seeking care. 

 

Kailey Voellinger is the clinic director at Trust Women clinic in Oklahoma City. She said her facility typically helps a variety of patients. 

 

“We serve a wide population. People from all walks of life: the homeless to the incarcerated, young people, women who have had five children and they’re 45.”

 

Voellinger said it’s the poor and disenfranchised who will suffer most from the ban. 

 

(Note: This discussion first aired back in March.) Our guest is Dorothy Wickenden, an author and editor at The New Yorker Magazine. She tells us about her new book, which explores various interlinked facets of American history, including abolition, the Underground Railroad, the early women's rights movement, and the Civil War. As the noted Yale historian David W. Blight has written of this book: "As a revolutionary, Harriet Tubman made many allies, none more important than her Auburn, New York, neighbors Martha Wright and Frances Seward.

When the documentary film "Period. End of Sentence." won an Oscar in 2019, the film's co-producer, Melissa Berton, said in her acceptance speech: "A period should end a sentence, not a girl's education." Now comes a new book that follows-up on that goundbreaking movie, a far-reaching book that outlines the challenges confronting those who menstruate worldwide and the solutions being offered by a new generation of body-positive activists and innovators. Our guest is the author of this work, Anita Diamant.

Our guest is Dorothy Wickenden, an author and editor at The New Yorker Magazine. She tells us about her fascinating new book, which explores various interlinked facets of American history, including abolition, the Underground Railroad, the early women's rights movement, and the Civil War. As the noted Yale historian David W. Blight has written of this book: "As a revolutionary, Harriet Tubman made many allies, none more important than her Auburn, New York, neighbors Martha Wright and Frances Seward.