World War I

(Note: This show originally aired last year.) Our guest is Julie Berry, the bestselling young-adult novelist. She joins us to discuss her latest book, "Lovely War: A Novel." As was noted of this work by School Library Journal: "The Greek gods relate the tale of how four young people's fates collide in a love story for the ages. Caught by Hephaestus in an compromising position with Ares, the god of War, Aphrodite is put on trial by her husband in a Manhattan hotel.

(Note: This interview first aired back in December.) Our guest is Phil Keith, the co-author of a remarkable biography titled "All Blood Runs Red: The Legendary Life of Eugene Bullard -- Boxer, Pilot, Soldier, Spy." As was noted of this compelling work in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "This dazzling biography, drawing on the subject's unpublished memoir, explores the incredible life and times of the first African-American fighter pilot: Eugene 'Gene' Bullard.

Our guest is Phil Keith, who is the co-author of a remarkable new biography titled "All Blood Runs Red: The Legendary Life of Eugene Bullard -- Boxer, Pilot, Soldier, Spy." As was noted of this compelling work in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "This dazzling biography, drawing on the subject's unpublished memoir, explores the incredible life and times of the first African-American fighter pilot: Eugene 'Gene' Bullard. At 12, he ran away from Columbus, Ga., to escape the vicious racism of the early-20th-century South for France, the country revered by his formerly enslaved father.

"Lovely War: A Novel"

Aug 20, 2019

Our guest is Julie Berry, the bestselling young-adult novelist. Her writing has earned starred reviews from Kirkus, Publisher's Weekly, the Horn Book, and elsewhere. She joins us to discuss her new book, "Lovely War: A Novel." As was noted of this work by School Library Journal: "The Greek gods relate the tale of how four young people's fates collide in a love story for the ages. Caught by Hephaestus in an compromising position with Ares, the god of War, Aphrodite is put on trial by her husband in a Manhattan hotel.

Our guest is Catherine Whitney, the Chief Curator and Curator of American Art at Philbrook Musuem of Art here in Tulsa. She tells us about a just-opened, far-reaching exhibit at Philbrook, curated by herself, called "Making Modern America." Featuring 60+ paintings, photographs, design objects, and prints -- and on view through May 26th -- this show explores how U.S. artists working from 1910 to 1960 depicted the dramatic social and environmental changes of this pivotal era.

Photo by Erin Baiano

On the 100th anniversary of the end of "The War to End All Wars," the Tulsa Symphony will commemorate those lost in that war and all the wars that followed with a performance of Benjamin Britten's War Requiem. The work ingeniously combines the text of the Latin funeral mass with the war poetry of Wilfred Owen, a young British poet who served and died in the trenches of the First World War.

Tulsa Ballet will soon offer, on May 3rd through the 6th, its season-ending Signature Series production, a gathering of three distinct yet thought-provoking works on themes cultural, social, and political. Alongside ballets by Nacho Duato and Ma Cong, the 1932 anti-war piece "The Green Table" will be staged. Our guests on ST are two internationally respected dancers who are both in town to handle the staging of "The Green Table" -- Jeanette Vondersaar and Claudio Schellino.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in May.) We speak with the New Mexico-based writer and biographer James McGrath Morris, who joins us to discuss his newest work: "The Ambulance Drivers: Hemingway, Dos Passos, and a Friendship Made and Lost in War." As was noted of this historical biography by the New York Journal of Books: "[This book] delves head-first into the mercurial relationship of these two American literary legends....

On this edition of ST, we learn about a striking new show at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa; "Hope & Fear: Propaganda of the Great War" will be on view through November 12th. Our guests are the show's co-curators, Chief Curator Catherine Whitney and Librarian/Archivist Thomas Young. As noted of this exhibit at the Philbrook website: "To commemorate the 100th anniversary year of America's entry into World War I, Philbrook presents wartime propaganda art from the Museum's permanent collection.

On this installment of ST, we speak with the New Mexico-based writer and biographer James McGrath Morris, who is the author of (among other books) the bestselling "Eye on the Struggle: Ethel Payne, The First Lady of the Black Press." Morris joins us to discuss his newest work, which is just out: "The Ambulance Drivers: Hemingway, Dos Passos, and a Friendship Made and Lost in War." As was noted of this historical biography by the New York Journal of Books: "[This book] delves head-first into the mercurial relationship of these two American literary legends....

On this edition of ST, we offer an interesting interview with John M. Kinder, an assistant professor of American studies and history at Oklahoma State University.

On this Veterans Day edition of StudioTulsa, we're talking about a certain classic novel that came out of World War I, "The Four Horsemen of The Apocalypse" by the Spanish author Vicente Blasco Ibáñez, and about a silent-film epic, from 1921, which had the same title, and which was based on this novel -- and which also introduced audiences around the globe to an unknown actor named Rudolph Valentino.

On this edition of The Best of StudioTulsa, we listen back to our conversation with author and journalist Scott Anderson, who has reported from Lebanon, Israel, Egypt, Sudan, Bosnia, El Salvador, and other war- and strife-torn countries. Anderson's newest book, which he speaks about on today's show, is "Lawrence in Arabia: War, Deceit, Imperial Folly and the Making of the Modern Middle East." One New York Times book critic has hailed this work as "fine, sophisticated, richly detailed...[and] filled with invaluably complex and fine-tuned information.... Eminently readable....

"Diplo-Mapping: The Maps Diplomats Draw and Their Consequences"

Nov 15, 2013

When lines are drawn on a map --- when the borders of a given state are finally, somehow, agreed upon --- how are the people and culture connected with these lines affected, both immediately and over time? How, and why, are societies or customs changed --- or not changed --- when such lines are established?

On this edition of ST, we chat with the author and journalist Scott Anderson, who has reported from Lebanon, Israel, Egypt, Sudan, Bosnia, El Salvador, and many other strife-torn countries, and whose writing has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, Esquire, Harper's, and Outside. Anderson tells us about his newest book, "Lawrence in Arabia: War, Deceit, Imperial Folly and the Making of the Modern Middle East," which a New York Times book critic has hailed as "fine, sophisticated, richly detailed...[and] filled with invaluably complex and fine-tuned information....