Writers on Writing

(Note: This interview first aired in September of 2020.) Our guest is Rachel Louise Snyder, an award-winning journalist and professor of creative writing and journalism at American University. She talks about her latest book, which is "No Visible Bruises: What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us." As was noted of this widely-acclaimed study by The Washington Post: "Compulsively readable.... In a writing style that's as gripping as good fiction, as intimate as memoir, and deeply informed, [Snyder] takes us into the lives of the abused, the abusers, and the survivors....

We are pleased to welcome Joy Harjo back to StudioTulsa. The poet, writer, performer, and musician is the current United State Poet Laureate. She's also a Tulsa resident, and a Tulsa Artist Fellow. A member of the Mvskoke/Creek Nation, she started writing as a young woman and started playing saxophone in her forties -- by now, she's well-regarded and widely celebrated in both capacities. Harjo joins us to discuss her new album, "I Pray for My Enemies," which is the first new recording of her music to appear in a decade.

(Note: This interview first aired back in October.) We welcome Sarah Smarsh back to StudioTulsa for a discussion of her latest book. It's a collection of essays that all focus on a certain country-music icon who also happens to be one of the most unifying figures in American culture: Dolly Parton. Smarsh talks with us about how Parton has, for decades now, both embodied and emboldened American women who live and work in poverty.

Our guest is Kayleen Schaefer, a journalist and author who has written for The New York Times, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, and other publications. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "But You're Still So Young: How Thirtysomethings Are Redefining Adulthood." The book looks carefully at how thirtysomethings in America today are -- and aren't -- meeting the milestones which sociologists commonly cite as the five markers of adulthood: finishing school, leaving home, marriage, gaining financial independence, and having kids.

Our guest is the writer Andrea Pitzer, who tells us about her newest book. It's a page-turning work of history about the Dutch polar explorer William Barents, one of the 16th century's greatest navigators. In particular, "Icebound: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World" details the three harrowing Arctic expeditions that Barents led, the last of which resulted in an extremely challenging year-long fight for survival. As was noted by The Wall Street Journal: "A fascinating modern telling of Barents's expeditions.... Ms.

Our guest is the writer and film historian Mark Harris, whose newest book, which he tells us about, is a biography of Mike Nichols (1931-2014). Born Mikhail Igor Peschkowsky in Berlin, the young Nichols, along with his brother and his parents, escaped the Nazis in 1939 by relocating to the United States. Nichols went on to have a long, remarkably creative career in show business, thriving as a film and theater director, actor, producer, and comedian. As a director, he was known and celebrated for helping his actors deliver particularly strong performances.

Our guest is Michelle Commander, an Associate Director and Curator at The Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture, which is a branch of the New York Public Library located in Harlem. The Schomberg Center has recently put out a pathbreaking new anthology, which she tells us about. The book is "Unsung: Unheralded Narratives of American Slavery and Abolition." It's a thorough and well-edited volume that traces gathers various writings and texts in order to convey the full historical arc of transatlantic slavery in the US.

Our guest is Dr. Michael F. Myers, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University in Brooklyn, New York. He's the author or co-author of several works, including "Why Physicians Die by Suicide." Dr. Myers joins us on StudioTulsa Medical Monday for a discussion of his new book, "Becoming a Doctors' Doctor: A Memoir." As was noted of this reflective and readable work by Dr.

Our guest is the Tulsa-based writer, creative writing teacher, playwright, and performer, Michael Wright. He's had an active, far-flung career in the dual worlds of literature and theatre. The author of novels, plays, poems, and varous performance-art and spoken-word experiments, Wright was also the 2010 Playwriting Teacher of the Year for the Association for Theatre in Higher Education and the winner of the Kennedy Center 2011 Milan Stitt Award for outstanding teaching and professional work in playwriting.

Our guest is the British author Jenny Lecoat. She's just published her debut novel, which she tells us about. "The Girl from the Channel Islands" is a compelling saga that happens to employ, at least in part, her own family's history. As was noted by Publishers Weekly: "Lecoat...draws on the history of Germany's WWII occupation of Jersey, one of the Channel Islands, where [she] was raised. During the summer of 1940, Hedy Bercu is living on Jersey after having escaped Nazi-occupied Vienna.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in August.) Robert Draper is our guest; he is a writer at large for The New York Times Magazine and a contributing writer to National Geographic. His past books include the bestselling "Dead Certain: The Presidency of George W.

The acclaimed Hollywood screenwriter Walter Bernstein died recently at the age of 101. His films included "Fail-Safe," "Paris Blues," "The Molly Maguires," "Semi-Tough," and lastly, to cite a 1976 classic starring Woody Allen that was based on Bernstein's own experiences as a blacklisted writer in Fifties Hollywood, "The Front." On this edition of ST, we listen back to our 1997 conversation with Walter Bernstein. At that time, he'd just put out a book called "Inside Out: A Memoir of the Blacklist."

(Note: This interview first aired last fall.) Our guest is Harold McGee, who writes about the science of food and cooking. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Nose Dive: A Field Guide to the World's Smells." As was noted of this work by Booklist: "In his detailed survey of scents, food writer and cooking scientist McGee elegantly explains olfaction.... His exploration of our smelly world includes the odors of flora and fauna, soil and smoke, food and fragrances, but also the unexpected: primordial earth, rain, and the whiff of old books.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're looking at the connections between diet, weight control, and health.

Our guest is Tamara Payne, who's the primary researcher and co-author (along with her late father, the esteemed investigative journalist Les Payne) of "The Dead Are Arising: The Life of Malcolm X." The recipient of the 2020 National Book Award, this biography draws upon countless interviews in order to contextualize Malcolm's life not only within the Nation of Islam but also within the broader sweep of modern American history.

Throughout the week, we've been spotlighting some standout StudioTulsa interviews from last year.

Our guest is Dr. Jeff Spiess, who has been caring for seriously and terminally ill patients for 30+ years, first as an oncologist, and later in the realm of hospice medicine. (In 2016, the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine named him as a recipient of the Josephina B. Magno Distinguished Hospice Physician Award.) Dr. Spiess joins us to discuss his new book, which is just out. It's called "Dying with Ease: A Compassionate Guide to Making Wiser End of Life Decisions." More about this title is posted here.

Our guest is the author and doctor Michael Stein, who's also a professor of health law, policy, and management at Boston University. He tells us about his new book, which presents the many various moving, sobering, genuine, and often heartbreaking accounts of his patients about money...and about having (or not having) enough money to simply get by in the U.S. today. "Broke" gives us the words and thoughts of those now facing the reality of having to choose between getting medical treatments or paying their bills. As was noted of this book by Dr.

Our guest is the writer Simon Han, who was born in China, grew up in Texas, and was formerly a Tulsa Artist Fellow. He joins us to discuss his new novel, "Nights When Nothing Happened." As was noted of this tender and perceptive coming-of-age saga in a starred review in Kirkus: "Han expertly shifts the ground under the narrative, constantly shaking the snow globe to nudge the reader's perspective away from the familiar.... [The book's] characters are authentic, vulnerable, and utterly convincing, delivering one dynamite novel.

Our guest is Katherine May, a writer of fiction as well as nonfiction based in the seaside community of Whitstable, England. She joins us to discuss her enjoyable new book, "Wintering," which draws many engaging and far-flung lessons from literature, history, nature, and mythology about the transformative -- and even inspiring -- power of rest, retreat, and recuperation. As was noted of this book by a critic writing for BookPage: "Beautiful.... [May] is a poetic observer of the natural world, and quotable lines abound....

How will the current pandemic affect our upcoming holiday season? And what lessons from history, politics, and pop culture might help us answer this question? Our guest is Denise Kiernan, an author, journalist, and producer whose previous two books, "The Last Castle" and "The Girls of Atomic City," were bestsellers.

Our guest is Emily Contois, Assistant Professor of Media Studies here at The University of Tulsa. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "Diners, Dudes, and Diets: How Gender and Power Collide in Food Media and Culture." It is, per Library Journal, "a fascinating work of cultural studies that makes evident the continued power and threat of explicitly gendered food production and consumption in the 21st century. [This book is] recommended broadly for students and scholars of fields related to gender, culture, and consumption." And please note that Prof.

(Note: This discussion originally aired back in August.) How do we learn? And how do we learn best? What are the most effective ways of educating today? Our guest is Dr. Sanjay Sarma, who's the leader of the Open Learning program at MIT. He joins us to discuss his book, "Grasp." This pioneering work looks at the science of learning -- i.e., how the acquisition of knowledge works both in the mind and in the classroom.

Our guest is the well-regarded historian and author Peter Cozzens, who joins us to discuss his new book, "Tecumseh and the Prophet: The Shawnee Brothers Who Defied a Nation." The book argues that Tecumseh was actually a co-leader of sorts of the Shawnee tribe with his often-misunderstood younger brother, Tenskwatawa. Please note that Mr. Cozzens will take part in a free, online, upcoming book-discussion event on Monday the 2nd, to be presented on the Zoom platform.

Our guest on ST is Harold McGee, who writes about the science of food and cooking. His earlier books include "On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen" and "Keys to Good Cooking: A Guide to Making the Best of Foods and Recipes." He joins us to discuss his new book, "Nose Dive: A Field Guide to the World's Smells." As was noted of this work by Booklist: "In his detailed survey of scents, food writer and cooking scientist McGee elegantly explains olfaction....

Our guest is Jared Yates Sexton, whose writing has included books and articles on politics, culture, and social justice, as well as works of fiction; he's an associate professor of creative writing at Georgia Southern University. He joins us to discuss his new book, which argues that the idea of "American exceptionalism" is not only false -- but it's been false since the country was founded.

Our guest is longtime Tulsa resident Jane Mudgett, a well-respected local leader and businesswoman who's also a certified coach, a trainer, and a partner at the Exceptional Leaders Lab. She joins us to talk about her book, which first appeared earlier this year.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the author Terri Cheney. Formerly a successful entertainment attorney -- her clients included Michael Jackson and Quincy Jones -- Cheny now works as an advocate for destigmatizing mental illness.

Our guest is Dan Alexander, a senior editor at Forbes Magazine, who joins us to discuss his new book, "White House, Inc." It's an in-depth investigation into President Trump's business holdings, and into how he used the highest office in the land to enrich these holdings. In order to document the president's endeavors to make money from his office, the book examines his exclusive clubs, luxury hotels, overseas partnerships, commercial properties, and personal mansions.

(Note: This interview first aired back in May.) Our guest is Walter Johnson, the Winthrop Professor of History and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. His new book is a far-reaching, unflinching, and complicated account of race relations in his hometown: St. Louis, Missouri. From Lewis and Clark's 1804 expedition to the 2014 uprising in Ferguson, the course of American events, Johnson argues, has been charted in St. Louis.

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