Writers on Writing

We're pleased to welcome our friend John Wooley back to StudioTulsa. A longtime Tulsa-based music and pop-culture writer -- and the host, of course, of the popular Swing on This program, heard every Saturday night here on KWGS -- Wooley is the co-author, along with Brett Bingham, of a new book about the historic Cain's Ballroom.

Our guest is Dr. Vinayak K. Prasad, a practicing hematologist-oncologist and internal medicine physician based in San Francisco. He joins us to discuss his important new book, "Malignant: How Bad Policy and Bad Evidence Harm People with Cancer." This work explains how hype, money, and bias can -- and often do -- mislead the public into thinking that many worthless or unproven cancer treatments are effective. As noted by Dr. David P.

Our guest is Walter Johnson, the Winthrop Professor of History and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. His new book is a far-reaching, unflinching, and complicated account of race relations in his hometown: St. Louis, Missouri. From Lewis and Clark's 1804 expedition to the 2014 uprising in Ferguson, the course of American events, Johnson argues, has been charted in St. Louis. His book moreover shows how the imperialism, racism, and capitalism that have defined the city have likewise defined our nation's history.

Our guest is Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, whose new book is a primer on world history -- specifically, world history as it's understood in our current global era. As the COVID-19 pandemic has made all too clear, we live in an age when things happening thousands of miles away can directly (and drastically) affect our own lives. As Haass explains on StudioTulsa, he wrote this book in order to help readers of all backgrounds make sense of this complicated, interconnected, crisis-laden world.

On this edition of ST, we present another installment in our Museum Confidential podcast series, which is a popular co-production of Public Radio Tulsa and Philbrook Museum of Art. This time out, MC speaks with longtime NYC-museum veteran Christine Coulson, who worked at The Met for a quarter of a century in a variety of roles. She left a couple of years ago to write full-time, and now comes her widely acclaimed and rather experimental debut novel: "Metropolitan Stories."

Our guest is Dr. Grant Jenkins, Associate Professor of English here at the University of Tulsa. He teaches creative writing as well as modern and contemporary U.S. literature, with a specialty in experimental poetry and poetics. Dr. Jenkins has just published his first novel, which he tells us about. "Ivory Tower" is an engrossing, genre-hopping crime thriller, set mainly on an American university campus. It's about a film professor who sets out to uncover sexual corruption within her school's football program. Please note that Dr.

Our guest is our friend, Barry Friedman, the Tulsa-based writer and comic, who's also a longtime commentator for this public-radio program. His son, Paul, died a few years ago from a drug overdose -- at age 24. And while Barry was devastated by this tragedy, as any parent would be, he was not really surprised. Paul's death, as Barry notes in his new book about his son, had been foreshadowed for years. Barry joins us to discuss his moving, unsettling, and perceptive new book, which is meant not as eulogy but as an elegy. And as the writer Dave Barry has noted: "It's a wonderful book.

On this final installment in our Found@TU podcast series, which has explored all manner of faculty research being done here at the University, we welcome Dr. Kristen Tegtmeier Oertel, the Mary Frances Barnard Professor of 19th Century American History. She describes her research on slavery and abolition, especially in relation to race and gender. Growing up on the Kansas/Missouri border, as it turns out, led Dr. Oertel to explore how Native Americans, African-Americans, and women shaped the politics of that region during the Civil War.

Our guest is Phil Keith, who is the co-author of a remarkable new biography titled "All Blood Runs Red: The Legendary Life of Eugene Bullard -- Boxer, Pilot, Soldier, Spy." As was noted of this compelling work in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "This dazzling biography, drawing on the subject's unpublished memoir, explores the incredible life and times of the first African-American fighter pilot: Eugene 'Gene' Bullard. At 12, he ran away from Columbus, Ga., to escape the vicious racism of the early-20th-century South for France, the country revered by his formerly enslaved father.

Our guest is the widely acclaimed writer and historian Stacy Schiff, who is the winner of the 2019 Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award. This award is given each year by the Tulsa Library Trust and Tulsa City-County Library.

(Note: This show first aired back in July.) Our guest is Carla Rachel Sameth, a writer who teaches at the LA Writing Project (at California State University Los Angeles) and at Southern New Hampshire University. She joins us to discuss her new book, "One Day on the Gold Line: A Memoir in Essays." As Sue William Silverman, author of "The Pat Boone Fan Club: My Life as a White Anglo-Saxon Jew," has noted of Sameth's book: "Race, class, drugs, sexuality, otherness.... Twenty-first century American hot-button issues are on full display in this brave, gritty, unflinching memoir.

Our guest is the Kansas City-based poet and teacher Anne Boyer, who joins us to discuss her bold, well-written memoir of cancer.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in July.) Our guest is the BBC journalist and author, Anita Anand. Her new book, a work of fascinating and compelling history, is "The Patient Assassin: A True Story of Massacre, Revenge, and India's Quest for Independence." This book tells the story of how Udham Singh, an orphan Sikh from India's lower castes, traveled to four continents over twenty years -- including the United States -- in an epic quest for revenge against a Raj official.

Our guest is Terence Hawkins, whose second novel, "American Neolithic," was named a Kirkus Reviews Best of 2014. In a starred review, some five years ago, Kirkus called it "a towering work of speculative fiction." This book is now appearing in a revised, newly re-published edition, and Hawkins tells us about it on ST today. As the bestselling novelist Tom Perrotta has noted of this work: "A one-of-a-kind novel, a bizarre but gripping amalgam of anthropology, political diatribe, and speculative science fiction....

Our guest is the Tulsa-based author Hunter Howe Cates, who tells us about his new book, "Oklahoma's Atticus." It's a work of biography/history that profiles his own grandfather, Tulsa County public defender and Creek tribal member Elliott Howe. Howe, as we learn, was closely involved in the investigation and trial of a Tulsa murder case that made national news back in the early 1950s. On Nov. 7th, Cates will do a free-to-the-public reading and signing in connection with this work at Magic City Books.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome John Wooley back to our show. He's well-known for hosting the popular Swing on This western-swing program, which is heard Saturday nights at 7pm here on Public Radio 89.5 FM. He's also a prolific author -- of both faction and nonfiction -- with an array of interests and passions. Wooley joins us to discuss his newest book, just out, which he co-wrote.

Our guest is the Colorado-based writer and writing instructor, Joanna Howard. She grew up in the Sooner State, and her newly published memoir, "Rerun Era," looks back on her childhood amid the environmentally and economically damaged rural flatlands of Northeastern Oklahoma. The book interweaves her personal memories, her family's larger story and dynamics, and the various TV shows that they all came together to watch (and bond over) in the late 1970s and early '80s.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we revisit our fascinating 2017 conversation with David Grann, the bestselling author and staff writer at The New Yorker Magazine. At that time, Grann was promoting his then-new book, "Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI" (which has been optioned for a much-talked-about film version). Grann will deliver a free-to-the-public Presidential Lecture here at TU on Tuesday the 22nd; his talk begins at 7:30pm in the Reynolds Center.

Our guest on ST is Margot Livesey, the Scottish-born, Boston-based writer whose work has earned a Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, the PEN New England Award, and the Massachusetts Book Award. She tells us about two of her books, "The Hidden Machinery: Essays on Writing" and "Mercury: A Novel." Of the latter, the New York Times noted: "Livesey knows her way around human desire and disappointment. Like the recent blockbusters 'Gone Girl' and 'Fates and Furies,' 'Mercury' gives us a marriage from alternating perspectives.

Our guest on ST is Petina Gappah, an award-winning, widely translated Zimbabwean writer and lawyer. She joins us to discuss her new novel, which explores the life of David Livingstone, the 19th-century Scottish missionary who famously set out to find the source of the Nile. As was noted of this book, which is called "Out of Darkness, Shining Light: A Novel," in The New York Times Book Review: "Gappah lists at least 30 books in the bibliography of her scrupulously researched new novel.

Our gust is Craig Johnson, author of the beloved and best-selling "Longmire" series of mystery novels. His newest book, "Land of Wolves," is the 15th novel to feature the Wyoming-based protagonist, Sheriff Walt Longmire. (These novels are also the basis, of course, for a popular TV series on Netflix.) Mr. Johnson will appear at a ticketed reading/signing event here in Tulsa on Thursday the 26th at the IDL Ballroom.

Our guest is the journalist Sarah Smarsh, whose book, "Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth," is now out in paperback. It's a far-reaching account of her coming of age in smalltown Kansas that sharply explores matters of poverty, class, family, income inequality, Midwestern values, personal ambition, faith, womanhood, and other key social and economic concerns.

(Note: This interview originally aired earlier this year.) Our guest is the British scholar Thomas Lockley, an Associate Professor at Nihon University College of Law in Tokyo, where he teaches courses related to the international and multicultural history of Japan and East Asia. He's also the co-author of a biography titled "African Samurai: The True Story of Yasuke, a Legendary Black Warrior in Feudal Japan," which he tells about.

Our guest is E.R. Ramzipoor, a writer based in California. She studied political science at UC-Berkeley, where she researched underground literature in resistance movements -- and her newly published first novel, which she tells us about, grew directly out of this research.

Got your "Hamilton" tickets yet...or did you already see it? The smash-hit Broadway musical is now beginning the second week of its run at the Tulsa PAC. And so we're offering a course in Hamilton 101 on today's ST as we listen back to a 2003 interview with the author and historian Willard Sterne Randall. At the time, Randall had just put out "Alexander Hamilton: A Life."

(Note: This show first aired back in March.) Our guest is the Colorado-based writer Peter Heller, who tells us about his new novel, "The River." Per The Denver Post: "A fiery tour de force [of] poetic, staccato sentences and masterfully crafted prose.... The story itself resembles a trip down a river -- some parts are peaceful and allow for quiet introspection and big, deep breaths. But then you hit the rapids and the danger and risk jump off the page, forcing a sense of urgency. In those thrilling parts, reading required self-discipline.

"Lovely War: A Novel"

Aug 20, 2019

Our guest is Julie Berry, the bestselling young-adult novelist. Her writing has earned starred reviews from Kirkus, Publisher's Weekly, the Horn Book, and elsewhere. She joins us to discuss her new book, "Lovely War: A Novel." As was noted of this work by School Library Journal: "The Greek gods relate the tale of how four young people's fates collide in a love story for the ages. Caught by Hephaestus in an compromising position with Ares, the god of War, Aphrodite is put on trial by her husband in a Manhattan hotel.

Our guest is Gaylon White, who was a sportswriter for the Denver Post, the Arizona Republic, and the Oklahoma Journal before working in the corporate world for nearly forty years. He tells us about his new book, which is his third volume to focus on minor-league baseball. The book is "Left on Base in the Bush Leagues: Legends, Near Greats, and Unknowns in the Minors." As was noted of this work by a reviewer for Baseball Almanac: "Immerse yourself in the magic of being a bush league fan....

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Keele Burgin, an entrepreneur, activist, author, filmmaker -- and survivor. She tells us about her new memoir, which candidly documents her incredible personal story of self-preservation, self-discovery, and self-betterment. As was noted of this book by Jennifer Read Hawthorne, a bestselling author: "Keele Burgin is a living, breathing example of the triumph of the human spirit. The story of how she overcame the extreme abuse of her childhood is nothing short of breathtaking.

(Note: This show first aired earlier this year.) Nathan Englander is our guest; he's the bestselling author of "For the Relief of Unbearable Urges," "What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank," and other books. He joins us to discuss his new novel, "Kaddish.com." Per a critic writing for The New York Times, this book is "sublime.... [It] reads like a modern-day Hasidic tale in which religious characters are bedeviled by the challenges of upholding God's word in an all too human world.... Kafka and Roth's influences are felt in Englander's work....

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