Imprint

eNewsletter Column

When you read a book, you enter a different world.  But the act of reading does more than broaden our world-view; it creates empathy, and nurtures civility.  

Occassionally in our monthly newsletter, you'll hear a new voice: Rebecca Howard.  During her 15 years with Tulsa City-County Library, Rebecca launched the readers advisory service Your Next Great Read, and served as TCCL’s county-wide Literacy Coordinator.  Now, Rebecca is a regional manager, overseeing six branches of TCCL. 

  In Imprint, Rebecca will share her thoughts about the reader’s life, the community of the library, and, if we ask REALLY nicely, the occasional recommendation.  

Rebecca Howard

Fall offers us many comforts--farm stand apples, homemade soups, and long walks in the woods with leaves crunching underfoot. Fall fiction generally offers no such reprieve, which is just the way that I like it. 

Some readers live for juicy summer reads that inevitably wind up with the scent of sunscreen and sand embedded between the pages. For fall book lovers, a coffee or tea ring is the mark of a great read. (Important PSA: these stains are merely metaphorical if you’re reading a library copy, of course!) 

Red at the Bone

Aug 27, 2020

Jacqueline Woodson dedicates her 2019 novel Red at the Bone to “the ancestors, a long line of you bending and twisting.” I’ve been thinking a lot more about my ancestors lately, leaning into the strength of those who came before me who endured wars, economic disasters, or other, even deadlier, global pandemics. I’ve also been watching my parents move into advanced age with all its associate heartache and indignities.

PRT

If the past few months have taught me anything, it’s that I really should have read more read more Science Fiction. Seriously, a few more dystopian novels would have prepared me a bit more for what is passing for normal today. Am I dreaming this or is there seriously a “bubble town” in Disney World where professional basketball players are living right now?  School re-openings sound more like preparing for space travel. Most of us are banned from traveling to the EU, and even the Canadians are giving us a pleasant “no thanks.” Things feel really surreal, uncertain, and scary. 

PRT

As a librarian, it’s been heartening to see so many people sharing reading lists in the aftermath of George Floyd’s murder. For those who identify strongly as readers, the act of reading is more than entertainment; it can be a path to understanding and sense-making.  

PRT

By Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library

PRT

By Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library

I need you to imagine one of those expectation-versus-reality memes to describe what my reading life is like right now. 

PRT

The Search for Civil Conversation
By Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library 

Sense and Readability

Feb 6, 2020

Jane Austen to the Rescue!
by Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library

Read Better 
by Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library 

 

I know that this time of year is all about looking forward. Believe me that I am as vulnerable as anyone to the sense of optimism a new year brings. THIS will be the year I finally start meditating regularly, eating a plant based diet, and decluttering that back bedroom into which no one is allowed. 

 

PRT

Rebecca’s Favorite Books of the 
by Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library 

Rebecca Howard

Ten Books
By Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library 

A friend with unrelenting insomnia stumbled upon a little literary gem known as One Grand: Desert Island Books. Their “About Us” description reads: a curated bookstore in which celebrated thinkers, writers, artists, and other creative minds share the ten books they would take to their metaphorical desert island…” 

Um. What? 

At the Center of the Page 
By Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library 

I deeply believe in the power of reading. Reading fiction, I think, is especially powerful. I understand that this statement reflects my bias, but I think when you are reading for clarity, sense-making, and empathy, fiction reigns. For me fiction allows for a more deeply personal connection between reader and story. 

It’s Back-to-School! with Jonathan Franzen 
By Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library 

Readers’ Advisory to the Rescue! (Exciting Conclusion!)
By Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library 

What should I read next? 

Readers’ Advisory to the Rescue!
By Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library 

Summer Reading

May 3, 2019

Summer Reading
By Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library 

Your Next Great Read

Apr 4, 2019

Loving Lip(p)man
By Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library

The Emerald Isle, Home to Your Next Read
By Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library 

I’m intrigued by those DNA tests that can pinpoint your ancestry. As much as I’d like to try one, though, I’ve read way too many Margaret Atwood novels to hand over my genetic material to a for-profit entity. Paranoia aside, I feel like one of these tests could only validate what I know in my heart: I am Irish.

When a Book is a Mirror
By Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library

Reading in the New Year

Jan 10, 2019
PRT

Reading in the New Year
By Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library

On the first Monday of 2019, on the same evening that a College Football Playoff game aired, almost 180 people showed up for an event at the Hardesty Regional Library simply billed as a “book club party.” As people began congregating in a line at the meeting room door, my fellow organizers and I looked at each other in astonishment, having planned for 50-60 people at best. Readers are often surprising creatures. 

NPR Books

My Year in (the best) Books
By Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library

Loving the Book Sharers
By Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library

PRT

A Creative and Subversive Act
By Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library

What is it about Shakespeare’s works that continue to inspire and captivate us? I recently attended a National Theater Live broadcast of the Chichester Festival Theatre’s production of King Lear staring Ian McKellen. In an interview airing before the broadcast, McKellen explained how every performance is different because “the audience writes the play.”