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Planned Parenthood Great Plains reacts after Roe v. Wade overturned

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Roe v. Wade is no longer the law of the land. After the supreme court overturned the landmark abortion decision, some state legislatures were given the choice of banning or allowing abortions.

While many states still recognize the right to bodily autonomy, “trigger laws” in 13 states including Oklahoma have gone into effect banning abortion almost immediately.

Emily Wales president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Great Plains said the organization has been planning for today’s decision.

"We knew this moment was coming, but the impact of today's opinion — erasing nearly 50 years of constitutional protections for abortion — is beyond devastating," Wales explained.

Medical experts say they’re concerned about the repercussions this will have on women's health.

Dr. Iman Alsaden said abortion is an essential part of comprehensive reproductive healthcare.

"The blow to women's and patient's healthcare is going to devastating," Alsaden explained. "It's going to be devastating for all of our communities throughout the country."

For patients living in states without immediate access, Alsayden says they might need to look elsewhere to receive care.

Planned Parenthood said they do not believe any contraception access will be interrupted, and that they will continue to provide other regular services.

Before making her way to Public Radio Tulsa, KWGS News Director Cassidy Mudd worked as an assignment editor and digital producer at a local news station. Her work has appeared on ABC, CBS, and NBC affiliates across the country.