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"Antiques Roadshow," Lark Mason, and the Fate of Those Record-Breaking Chinese Rhino Horn Cups

lark mason TV.jpg
Aired on Monday, March 19th.

On today's StudioTulsa, we listen back to an interview that first aired in November. At that time, we spoke with Lark Mason, an Asian art expert and longtime appraiser for "Antiques Roadshow," the popular public television program. Earlier last year, during an "Antiques Roadshow" taping here in Tulsa in July, Mason had valued a set of five 17th-century Chinese rhinoceros horn cups --- the property of Tulsa resident Doug Huber, who started collecting them in 1969 while on vacation in England (and who spent about $5,000 on acquiring them, over the years) --- at $1 to $1.5 million. After Mason's appraisal, which was (and remains) the highest dollar-amount evaluation ever in the history of "Antiques Roadshow," the cups went on display at the Philbrook Museum of Art, from August to December of last year. Tomorrow (Tuesday the 20th), in a manner of speaking, the incredible story of these remarkable, intricately carved cups and their discovery comes to a close. For that is when these cups will go on sale at an auction at Sotheby's in New York. You'll find more information on this story here.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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