Rich Fisher

General Manager & host of StudioTulsa

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government.  Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.  

In addition, Rich is an active musician. He’s currently the principal trombonist of the Signature Symphony at TCC, leads the Starlight Jazz Orchestra, and is a free-lance musician whose work ranges from the pit of touring Broadway musicals, to the salsa band, Grupo Salsabor.

Ways to Connect

Our guest is Dr. Neal D. Barnard, a faculty member of the George Washington University School of Medicine who is also a bestselling author and president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Your Body in Balance." As was noted of this book by Dr. Robert Ostfeld, Director of Preventive Cardiology at Montefiore Health System in New York: "[This book] is an incredible resource. If you have ever wondered how the food you eat impacts your fertility, erectile function, thyroid function, skin, hair, and so much more, wonder no longer.

Our guest on ST is Oklahoma Lt. Gov. Matt Pinnell, who joins us to discuss the new brand for the State of Oklahoma: "Imagine That." Pinnell led the lengthy, multifaceted process that came up with this recently-announced brand, which will soon start appearing on t-shirts, stickers, roadside signs, posters at airports, newly-designed license plates, and so on. He describes this brand-development process, and the thinking and planning that went into it, while also explaining what he believes this new brand will accomplish for our state.

Very early in her career, American colonial historian Mary Beth Norton came to believe that the critical year in American independence was not 1776, but the year, 1774. But her academic focus on women's colonial history, sidelined her interest in fleshing out this theory.

For the past two years, veteran public radio host Diane Rehm has been exploring the circumstances surrounding death, and the rights of the dying to determine how and when their life should end. Haunted by the painful and prolonged death of her mother, then later her husband, the former host of the "Diane Rehm Show" has become an advocate for medical aid in death.

Our guest is Susan Neal, Executive Director of Gilcrease Museum, which recently announced that its current facility will be not just refurbished or remodeled but, indeed, entirely rebuilt. The museum announced over the weekend that its current building will be demolished, and that a new structure will be erected in its place. As Neal expalins, Gilcrease has been added to -- and/or expanded upon -- several times over the years. The oldest parts of the museum date back to 1913; the newest building in the Gilcrease complex dates from the 1980s.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Adam Hill, who works in the Pediatric Palliative Care Unit at Indiana University's Riley Hospital for Children. He joins us to discuss his new memoir, "Long Walk Out of the Woods: A Physician's Story of Addiction, Depression, Hope, and Recovery." As was noted of this book by Library Journal: "[Hill] shares a deeply personal story...in an effort to improve access, treatment options, and resources for all affected by similar conditions.

The Tulsa Symphony Orchestra will offer its next concert tomorrow night, Saturday the 8th, at the Tulsa PAC. The exciting program will include music by Michael Torke as well as Grieg's lyrical Piano Concerto (with guest artist Sean Chen at the keyboard). Also, Mozart's Symphony No. 39 will be presented. Our guest on ST will be the guest conductor for this concert: Leslie Dunner.

The nonprofit Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition, or OVAC, which began in 1988, actively supports visual artists living and working throughout Oklahoma. On this edition of ST, we learn about a new OVAC show on view at ahha Tulsa -- it's a triennial exhibition called Concept, and it will be on display through March 22nd. Our guests are Sarah Ahmad, and artist whose work appears in this show, and Krystle Brewer, the executive director of OVAC.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we meet the co-founder and artistic director of Tulsa's World Stage Theatre Company which is presenting "I Have Before Me a Remarkable Document Given to Me by a Young Lady From Rwanda," which opens Thursday evening at the Liddy Doenges Theatre of the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. The play, by Sonja Linden, tells the story of the encounter between a Rwandan refugee who is struggling to tell the story of her nation's genocide, and an English writer working at a refugee center.

Denver University law professor Cesar Cuauhtemoc Garcia Hernandez has been a harsh critic of U-S immigration policy, and has helped coin a word to describe that policy, "crimmigation." A term which refers to how immigration law, at one time, was a civil law proceeding, but today has merged with criminal law. Roughly 400,000 migrants are imprisoned each year, far more than Professor Garcia Hernandez says is necessary. Today's immigration detainee may be surprising.

(Note: This interview first aired back in October.) Our guests are the Harvard evolutionary biologist Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and the award-winning science writer Kathryn Bowers, who tell us about their jointly written book, "Wildhood." It makes several fascinating connections between the lives and behaviors of teenage animals and those of teenage human beings. Per the Los Angeles Times: "The vivid storytelling and fascinating scientific digressions in [this book] make it a pleasurable read.

As more people identify as non-binary, individuals often introduce themselves by the pronouns with which they identify. E-mails are signed with he/him/his, she/her/hers or they/them/theirs. Pronouns are now playing a prominent role in gender politics. This may seem new, but linguists have been puzzling over pronouns for a century or more.  Conflicts over pronoun usage goes back to the days of suffrage and gender equality, today it's the usage of a word thought to be plural --"they"--to denote a gender-neutral singular person. 

Keith Recker's life is all about colors. As a color trend consultant and forecaster for Pantone, he identifies new colors -- like Pantone's "Living Coral" (Pantone's color of the year for 2019) -- which designers in apparel, advertising, and industry look to in attracting eyes to their products.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we meet investigative journalist John Carreyrou, a two-time Pulitzer winning reporter with the Wall Street Journal, who broke the story of the fraud perpetrated by the medical tech company Theranos and its young CEO Elizabeth Holmes. The company had purportedly created a device that would revolutionize blood testing, utilizing just a few drops of blood, but was found to be a sham. At its peak, Theranos had a market value of $10 billion and its flawed prototype was actually in market testing in California and Arizona before Carreyrou helped expose the fraud.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Donna Thomson, who is a co-author of "The Unexpected Journey of Caring: The Transformation from Loved One to Caregiver." As was noted of this important new guidebook by Booklist: "Caregivers often sacrifice their own health and relationships to take care of loved ones, which is a big problem in the United States, where nearly 45 million Americans provide unpaid care to an adult or child with medical problems or chronic conditions.

Samella Lewis "Field"
Gregory Staley

The Gilcrease Museum opened a new exhibition of African-American art collected by two ordinary people who created an extraordinary collection of artwork. Kerry Davis was a postman, and his wife, Betty, was a local television producer, but the two collected close to 300 works by black artists ranging from local artists in their hometown of Atlanta, Georgia, to internationally known artists, like Jacob Lawrence, Romare Bearden, Sam Gilliam, Elizabeth Catlett, Alma Thomas, and Norman Lewis.

New Society Publishers

As concern about the state of our land, air, and water grows, there is a belief among some within the environmental community, that there is a disconnect between environmental stewardship and communities of color. Angelou Ezeilo works to correct that misconception and works to open doors in those institutions that haven't been particularly welcoming to people of color.

Impact Tulsa

For the past six years, Impact Tulsa, a community partnership between Tulsa County school districts, business leaders, government, community organizations and philanthropic groups have been targeting several key indices for educational improvement. Through the collection of data, the group has designed and implemented strategies to improve kindergarten readiness, third-grade reading proficiency, eighth-grade mathematics proficiency, high school completion, postsecondary enrollment, and postsecondary completion.

Our guest, Dr. Arthur Kleinman of Harvard University, is an acclaimed and influential scholar-writer on the topics of psychiatry, anthropology, global health, and cultural issues in medicine. He's also the author of "The Illness Narratives: Suffering, Healing, and the Human Condition," which has long been taught in many U.S. medical schools. Dr. Kleinman joins us to discuss his new book, a work of both memoir and scholarship that stems from the pivotal decade or so during which he cared for his late wife.

Our guest is E.R. Ramzipoor, a writer based in California. She studied political science at UC-Berkeley, where she researched underground literature in resistance movements -- and her newly published first novel, which she tells us about, grew directly out of this research.

Tulsa Transit

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we meet the lead consultant for Tulsa's Mobility Innovation Strategy, which will encompass new ways of getting around the city from Rapid Bus Transit and scooters today, to autonomous and connected vehicles in the near future.  Kelley Coyner is the mobility innovation lead for the consultant firm Stantec, who has experience in government, education, research, and transit systems, and discusses the benefits of city investment in "smart transit," on vehicle and pedestrian safety, efficiency, environmental quality, and economic development.

PHOTO BY CNN.COM

Our guest is Dr. Joshua Landis, Director of the Center for Middle East Studies and Professor at the University of Oklahoma's College of International Studies. He recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (or TCFR) titled "The U.S. and the Middle East: Making Sense of Oil, Regime Change, and Forever Wars." Dr. Landis also writes "Syria Comment," a daily newsletter on Syrian politics that attracts 100,000 readers per month -- and he often consults with U.S.

Our guest is Dan Weissmann, a public-radio reporter/editor/producer whose work has appeared on Marketplace, Planet Money, 99 Percent Invisible, and NPR’s Morning Edition. He once again joins us on ST Medical Monday to give an update on An Arm and a Leg, his widely acclaimed podcast about the various price tags that come with health care in the U.S.

Our guest is Daniel Hege, who will tomorrow night (Saturday the 11th) conduct the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra in its next concert. The program, titled "Strauss and Schumann," will offer an evening of lush, ornate, wholly gorgeous music. The night opens with J.S. Bach's "Fantasia and Fugue in C Minor," as orchestrated by Sir Edward Elgar. Next comes Richard Strauss' "Four Last Songs," featuring the acclaimed soprano Sarah Coburn. And finally: "Symphony No. 2" by Robert Schumann. Details are posted here

Our guest is Dr. Grant Jenkins, Associate Professor of English here at the University of Tulsa. He teaches creative writing as well as modern and contemporary U.S. literature, with a specialty in experimental poetry and poetics. Dr. Jenkins has just published his first novel, which he tells us about. "Ivory Tower" is an engrossing, genre-hopping crime thriller, set mainly on an American university campus. It's about a film professor who sets out to uncover sexual corruption within her school's football program. Please note that Dr.

Our guest is our friend, Barry Friedman, the Tulsa-based writer and comic, who's also a longtime commentator for this public-radio program. His son, Paul, died a few years ago from a drug overdose -- at age 24. And while Barry was devastated by this tragedy, as any parent would be, he was not really surprised. Paul's death, as Barry notes in his new book about his son, had been foreshadowed for years. Barry joins us to discuss his moving, unsettling, and perceptive new book, which is meant not as eulogy but as an elegy. And as the writer Dave Barry has noted: "It's a wonderful book.

Our guest is Devin Fergus, the Strickland Distinguished Professor of History, Black Studies, and Public Affairs at the University of Missouri. He's written on politics, policy, and inequality in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The American Prospect, The Guardian, and so forth. He joins us to discuss his latest book, which is just out in paperback: "Land of the Fee: Hidden Costs and the Decline of the American Middle Class." This book exposes the effects that fees have on wealth redistribution, from the poor and the middle class up to wealthy corporations.

It's easy to take safe drinking water for granted, but so very much of public health stems from having it (that is, having lots of it) on hand. Moreoever, the problems that've recently affected Flint, Michigan -- and other communities -- have brought the whole potable-water issue to the forefront for many Americans. Where does Tulsa's drinking water come from, and how does it get here? How safe is it, and how clean or "pure" is it? And how do we know these things? How is our water monitored? And how often?

Happy New Year, and thank you for listening to StudioTulsa.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about The Prism Project, a far-reaching, recently-released needs-assessment survey that was commissioned in order to better inform the Greater Tulsa community about issues related to our LGBTQ+ neighbors, friends, and fellow citizens. As per the Prism Project website, Tulsa Reaches Out (which is an advisory council within the Tulsa Community Foundation) "commissioned The Hope Research Center at the University of Oklahoma-Tulsa to conduct the survey within Tulsa's LGBTQ+ community.

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