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"How Eskimos Keep Their Babies Warm" (Encore presentation.)

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On this installment of our show, which originally aired earlier this year, we speak with the author and journalist Mei-Ling Hopgood, formerly of Buenos Aires, now living and working (and parenting) in the American Midwest. Hopgood's new book is called "How Eskimos Keep Their Babies Warm: And Other Adventures in Parenting (from Argentina to Tanzania and Everywhere in Between)." It's an engrossing and accessible book about what we as Americans can learn from how other cultures approach the challenges all parents confront: bedtimes, potty training, feeding, play dates, teaching, and so forth. The author observes parents around the globe and interviews a wide array of anthropologists, educators, and child-care experts --- and thereby exposes the reader to a whole world of new ideas. As was noted of this book in a starred review in Booklist: "Informative and deeply engaging. Eschewing the confrontational 'tiger mother' style, Hopgood learns how babies in different parts of the world eat, sleep, play, and more. . . . Throughout her carefully organized text, she shows enormous respect for everyone she speaks with and everything she learns. . . . A best bet for new parents."

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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