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"How Jews Found a Home in the South"

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Our guest on this installment of ST is Dr. Stuart Rockoff, who will give the annual Cadenhead-Settle Lecture --- presented by TU's Department of History every fall --- tomorrow night (Wednesday the 24th) here on the University of Tulsa campus. The lecture will begin at 7pm in the Tyrrell Hall Auditorium; it's entitled "Bagels and Grits: How Jews Found a Home in the South." Dr. Rockoff is Director of the History Department at the Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life in Jackson, Mississippi. At the Goldring/Woldenberg Institute's website, by way of introduction, we find the following: "Founded as the Museum of the Southern Jewish Experience in 1986, the Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life is dedicated to providing educational and rabbinic services to Southern Jewish communities, documenting and preserving the rich history of the Southern Jewish experience, and promoting a Jewish cultural presence throughout a thirteen state region." You can learn more about Dr. Rockoff's upcoming TU lecture, which is free and open to the public, at this link.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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