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"Dancing With You After You've Gone" --- A Conversation with Jazz Saxophonist Denny Morouse

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On this edition of StudioTulsa, Rich Fisher speaks with local saxophonist and composer Denny Morouse. The Pittsburgh native was a fixture in New York City music circles from the 1970s through the 1990s, working with pop superstars like Stevie Wonder, with various studio/commercial outfits, and with jazz legends like the drummer Art Blakey and the organist Larry Young. Morouse moved to Tulsa a few years ago, during the terminal illness of a close family member, and he's been based here since. His latest recording reunites him with the great trumpeter Randy Brecker --- the two had worked together in Stevie Wonder's band, among others --- along with a NY-based Brazilian rhythm section (guitarist Romero Lubumbo, pianist Helio Alves, bassist Nilson Matta, and drummer Duduka da Fonseca). "Dancing With You After You've Gone" is the saxophonist fifth recording under his own name, and the CD also features Tulsa singer Annie Ellicott on two numbers.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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