Great Plains (American Region)

(Note: This show first aired back in July.) Our guest is Russell Gold, who has reported on energy regularly in The Wall Street Journal since 2002; his coverage of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill was honored with a Gerald Loeb Award and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Gold joins us to discuss his book, "Superpower: One Man's Quest to Transform American Energy." This book profiles Michael Skelly, an infrastructure builder who began working on wind energy in 2000, back when many people considered the entire wind-power industry a joke.

Our guest is Russell Gold, who has reported on energy regularly in The Wall Street Journal since 2002; his coverage of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill was honored with a Gerald Loeb Award and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Gold joins us to discuss his new book, "Superpower: One Man's Quest to Transform American Energy." This book profiles Michael Skelly, an infrastructure builder who began working on wind energy in 2000, back when many people considered the entire wind-power industry a joke.

Our guest is the Oklahoma-based author, attorney, and legal scholar Walter Echo-Hawk.

On this installment of ST, we preview a new exhibition that will soon open at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "Alexandre Hogue: An American Visionary -- Paintings and Works on Paper" will be on view at Gilcrease from August 24th through November 30th. Mainly known for his "Dust Bowl" or "Erosion Series" of Depression-era paintings, Alexandre Hogue (1898-1994) was one of the more celebrated artists to come to prominence during the Regionalist movement in American art (which also saw the rise of such masters as Thomas Hart Benton and Grant Wood).

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a fine interview that first aired in March of this year with H. Alan Day, who's the younger brother of former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. Day tells us about his then-recent memoir, "The Horse Lover," which is a moving and perceptive account of how he established a sanctuary for unadoptable wild horses previously warehoused by the Bureau of Land Management. Mustang Meadows Ranch, as the facility was called, began in the late 1980s; it was the first-ever government-sponsored wild horse sanctuary established in the United States.

Farming, as a way of life, has of course been on the decline in this country for a long time now --- and one way in which we can actually see this dwindling livelihood is by noting the disappearing or decaying farm structures throughout America's rural landscape: the houses, barns, and out-buildings that made such a landscape habitable in the first place. Our guest is a photographer whose work tells the stories of these once-loved-but-now-abandoned buildings. Nancy Warner joins us by phone; she's a fine-art and portrait photographer based in San Francisco.