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Oklahoma First Responders Get High-Tech Tool to Use in Opioid Crisis

First responders and public health agencies can now see overdose information across Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics is offering access to the nationwide Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program, or ODMAP. Developed through the federal High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas program, ODMAP lets agencies share data on overdoses in real time by entering nine pieces of information into a smart phone app. Agencies can see overdose trends and even set an alert for when they spike. ...

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Carol Durkee

Bixby Bomber Found Not Guilty By Reason of Insanity

A man accused of detonating a pipe bomb outside an Oklahoma military recruiting station has been found not guilty by reason of insanity. Court records in Tulsa indicate a federal judge handed down the verdict Tuesday to 29-year-old Benjamin Roden. The former Air Force senior airman was indicted for destruction of government property after a pipe bomb exploded in front of an unoccupied Air Force recruiting station near Tulsa on July 10, 2017. No one was hurt. The ruling states psychological...

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Following Crash, All F-35s Temporarily Grounded For Inspections

All F-35 fighter jets deployed to the U.S. and its allies have been temporarily grounded following a crash of one of the aircraft in South Carolina last month. In a statement, the F-35 Joint Program Office said the U.S. and its international partners had suspended flights of the Joint Strike Fighter, also known as the Lightening II, until a fleet-wide inspection of the aircraft's fuel tubes is completed. "If suspect fuel tubes are installed, the part will be removed and replaced," the...

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Two Scoops: The Museum of Ice Cream and The New York Times

StudioTulsa

On this installment of ST, we learn about a remarkable and newly launched exhibit at Gilcrease, "Americans All!" This show, which is ongoing, is (per the Gilcrease website) the museum's "latest exhibition drawn from [its] permanent collection...[and it] showcases the many positive contributions immigrants have made, and continue to make, to American life and culture.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, an interesting discussion with Dr. Ira Byock, one of the nation's leading palliative care physicians. Also known for his work as a writer and longtime public advocate for improving end-of-life care, Dr. Byock will soon (as in, tomorrow night, the 9th) give a free-to-the-public lecture at the Cascia Hall Auditorium here in Tulsa on "What Mortality Can Teach Us About Living." His book, "The Four Things That Matter Most," is now out in a Tenth Anniversary Edition. Dr.

The Tulsa Symphony Orchestra will soon kick off its new season with an Opening Night Gala Concert at the Tulsa PAC. (It happens tomorrow night, Saturday the 6th, with more info posted here.) On the program, the lyrical and masterful cello concerto by Dvorák, which will feature a guest appearance by the world-renowned cellist, Lynn Harrell.

On this edition of our show, we chat with Emily Zilber. A former curator at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and currently the editor of Metalsmith magazine, Zilber is now in Tulsa to serve as the curator for VisionMakers 2018 at 108 Contemporary. This show, which is the gallery's juried biennial exhibition, features the work of contemporary craft-based artists from a multi-state region, all of whom combine cutting-edge concepts with traditional skills in order to push the boundaries of art, craft, and design.

Our guest is Wendy Sherman, a Senior Counselor at Albright Stonebridge Group and a former Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs. Ambassador Sherman is also a Senior Fellow at Harvard's Belfer Center and is a member of both the Council on Foreign Relations and the Aspen Strategy Group. She was also a Chief Negotiator for the Iran Nuclear Deal; her newly published memoir is called "Not for the Faint of Heart: Lessons in Courage, Power, and Persistence." She was a guest recently of the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations.

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Most of the roads in Florida's Bay County are now impassable. There's no electricity, no working sewers, no gasoline, very little cell service, and a boil water advisory.

"This whole town's destroyed" after Hurricane Michael, says Ryan Smith, a mechanic in Lynn Haven, on the north side of Panama City, Fla.

He's standing outside a red brick apartment complex where most of the roofs are gone and giant pine trees have fallen through some of the buildings.

"This was our house," he says. "Now all our stuff's destroyed."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We are in a hard-fought congressional district, one of those that may decide control of the House of Representatives. A live audience is with us here at Broomwagon Bikes and Coffee. Folks, would you just let the country know that you're here?

(CHEERING)

In March 1980, Patricia Morales Tijerino and her sister had just left a wedding in a little chapel in El Salvador's capital and were on their way to the reception.

"And then I spotted him," Morales Tijerino recalls. "He was in his white cassock."

Óscar Arnulfo Romero, the Roman Catholic archbishop of San Salvador, was standing alone in a garden outside the church.

Movie Review: 'First Man'

14 hours ago

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NOEL KING, HOST:

It was one of the most dangerous missions in history, landing a man on the moon. Ryan Gosling stars as Neil Armstrong in the new film "First Man." It retells the dramatic history leading up to the Apollo 11 flight.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "FIRST MAN")

Our list of the best new albums out this week includes the comical and moving synth pop of John Grant, enchanting harmonies from The Watson Twins, an audacious jazz album from trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire, the first new music from Elvis Costello & The Imposers in a decade and more. Host Robin Hilton returns to breakdown this week's essential releases with NPR Music's Ann Powers and Stephen Thompson, and Nate Chinen from WBGO.

Featured Albums

  1. Elvis Costello & The Imposters: Look Now
    Featured Song: "Under Lime"

A number of states are blocking web traffic from foreign countries to their voter registration websites, making the process harder for some U.S. citizens who live overseas to vote, despite the practice providing no real security benefits.

All F-35 fighter jets deployed to the U.S. and its allies have been temporarily grounded following a crash of one of the aircraft in South Carolina last month.

In a statement, the F-35 Joint Program Office said the U.S. and its international partners had suspended flights of the Joint Strike Fighter, also known as the Lightening II, until a fleet-wide inspection of the aircraft's fuel tubes is completed.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

OK, let's go back to that moment when two women confronted Senator Jeff Flake in an elevator on Capitol Hill about the sexual assault allegations against Brett Kavanaugh.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi vowed this week to demand President Trump's tax returns if Democrats win control of the House of Representatives next month.

Pelosi, seeking to regain her gavel as House speaker after elections in November, told The San Francisco Chronicle editorial board that the move "is one of the first things we'd do — that's the easiest thing in the world. That's nothing."

Updated at 8:52 p.m. ET

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has a message for Republican voters who are celebrating the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh: Get to the polls in November if you want more conservatives sitting on judicial benches.

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