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Aerospace Firm in Broken Arrow Adding 80 Jobs for Work on Recently Awarded Defense Contracts

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A Broken Arrow–based maker of flight simulators is looking for dozens of new workers after winning another round of multimillion-dollar military contracts.

CymSTAR LLC needs 80 new employees for its coming work on simulators to train pilots on the Air Force’s upgraded A-10 planes and its aging E-4B, a 747 dubbed the "Doomsday plane" that serves as a command center when the president is out of the White House. The E-4B is getting too old for training runs.

CymStar President and CEO Dan Marticello said so far, the company has recruited most of its workforce from engineering programs at TU, OU and OSU.

"We’re not dealing with the Silicon Valley competition here in Oklahoma, but it’s been very good so far. I think with this growth, it’s going to be a challenge to source that many from those universities. We may have to expand our recruitment footprint," Marticello said.

The company mostly needs software engineers but will also hire some electrical and mechanical engineers. Salaries run $60,000 to $100,000.

Broken Arrow Chamber and Economic Development Corporation President Darla Heller said the jobs announcement is an important one for the local economy.

"We see most of new job growth come from our existing businesses, and these types of jobs that CymSTAR will be creating are high-wage jobs that are going to have a ripple effect on our economy for years to come," Heller said.

The Air Force contracts are in addition to roughly $26 million in Navy aircraft contracts CymSTAR was also awarded recently.

Matt Trotter joined KWGS as a reporter in 2013. Before coming to Public Radio Tulsa, he was the investigative producer at KJRH. His freelance work has appeared in the Los Angeles Times and on MSNBC and CNN.
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