© 2024 Public Radio Tulsa
800 South Tucker Drive
Tulsa, OK 74104
(918) 631-2577

A listener-supported service of The University of Tulsa
classical 88.7 | public radio 89.5
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations
Listen to President Biden's address to the nation tonight at 7:00pm, LIVE on KWGS 89.5 FM

Domestic violence prevention organization wants to help after spate of attacks on women in Tulsa

Text SAFE to 207-777 daily between 8 p.m. and 1 a.m. or call (918) 743-5763
Jiangang Wang
/
Moment Editorial/Getty Images
Text SAFE to 207-777 daily between 8 p.m. and 1 a.m. or call (918) 743-5763

A local nonprofit dedicated to rebuilding the lives of domestic violence survivors wants you to know they’re here to help.

Tracey Lyall, CEO, says Domestic Violence Intervention Services has been in Tulsa for over 45 years.

“We can help with safety planning, with someone who is considering leaving an abusive relationship. We can also help friends or family members who believe someone they love is an abusive relationship if they need some guidance on how to approach that,” said Lyall. “It’s devastating for us to hear that we’re losing lives to domestic violence in Tulsa."

Lyall said domestic violence has been bad in the city lately, with several shooting deaths of women happening over the past few weeks.

Latest data available from the state show domestic violence rates in Oklahoma overall are the highest they’ve been in 20 years.

To get in touch with DVIS, text SAFE to 207-777 daily between 8 p.m. and 1 a.m. or call (918) 743-5763.

Before joining Public Radio Tulsa, Elizabeth Caldwell was a freelance reporter and a teacher. She holds a master's from Hollins University. Her audio work has appeared at KCRW, CBC's The World This Weekend, and The Missouri Review. She is a south Florida native.