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Second excavation set in search of victims in 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre

Workers reinforce the sides of an excavation site during the search for a potential unmarked mass grave from the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, at Oaklawn Cemetery in Tulsa, Okla., in July.
Sue Ogrocki
/
AP
Workers reinforce the sides of an excavation site during the search for a potential unmarked mass grave from the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, at Oaklawn Cemetery in Tulsa, Okla., in July.

Archaeologists are set to begin another round of excavations at the Oaklawn Cemetery in search of victims of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre starting next week.

Excavation crews will pick back up on Wednesday October 26th in an area southwest of where 19 sets of human remains were found last year.

Those remains were moved to an on-site lab where scientists determined 14 of them could be identified.

Intermountain Forensics will again be taking over the genealogy analysis in the investigation and will be on site to collect DNA samples from potential victims of the race massacre.

City officials said the entire cemetery will be closed to the public during excavations that could last at least until November 18th.

As many as 300 Black Tulsans were killed by white mobs during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. A majority of those victims' remains still have not been found.

Before making her way to Public Radio Tulsa, KWGS News Director Cassidy Mudd worked as an assignment editor and digital producer at a local news station. Her work has appeared on ABC, CBS, and NBC affiliates across the country.