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"The Family Firm: A Data-Driven Guide to Better Decision Making in the Early School Years" (Encore)

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Aired on Friday, August 19th.

"Oster dives into the data on parenting issues, cuts through the clutter, and gives families the bottom line to help them make better decisions." -- Good Morning America

(Note: This interview originally aired last summer.) Our guest on ST is Emily Oster, a professor of economics at Brown University whose earlier books include "Expecting Better" and "Cribsheet." She joins us to talk about her book, "The Family Firm: A Data-Driven Guide to Better Decision Making in the Early School Years." As was noted of this volume by The Washington Post: "A targeted mini-MBA program designed to help moms and dads establish best practices for day-to-day operations.... Because this is an Oster book, there's data scattered everywhere -- on the development of reading skills by age, on the concussion risks of playing soccer, on the benefits of dipping Brussels sprouts in sweetened cream cheese. It's all presented in the breezy, skeptical style that's made Oster's work a must-read for parents who don't have the time to investigate Finnish studies about integrating extracurriculars into the school day."

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