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"The Screwtape Letters" --- the C.S. Lewis Satirical Classic of Christian Faith --- Onstage in B.A.

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On this edition of our show, we speak with Max McLean, the producer and director of "The Screwtape Letters" --- he also formerly starred in this production --- which will be staged at the Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center on Saturday the 5th at both 4pm and 8pm. This is a theatrical adaptation of the C.S. Lewis novel of the same title, which is a widely cherished little book (commonly seen as a masterpiece, and dating from the early 1940s) that presents letters written by one of Satan's leading demons (named Screwtape) to his nephew (named Wormwood). Wormwood, as it happens, is a rookie --- a newly inaugurated demon who is (throughout the letters comprising this novel) getting advice from his verbose, sophisticated uncle on how to lead a certain unnamed human being away from God, away from faith, and away from caring for others. As a book, and now also as a play, it's really a study of spiritual warfare, as McLean explains on our program, and it's also wickedly funny throughout --- often in a decidedly "reverse psychology" way. (You can learn more about this play at this link, and more about the Broken Arrow staging in particular here.) Also on today's ST, our commentator Barry Friedman offers the second piece in his three-part "Daughter Goes to Oregon" series --- today's installment, which is rather theatrical in its own right, is called "Vegas, Baby."

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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