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"A Higher Call: An Incredible True Story of Combat and Chivalry in the War-Torn Skies of WWII"

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Aired on Friday, May 23rd.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Adam Makos: a longtime journalist and military historian who's also the editor of the military-themed magazine, Valor. Makos is likewise the co-author of the bestselling nonfiction account, "A Higher Call: An Incredible True Story of Combat and Chivalry in the War-Torn Skies of World War II," which is just recently out in paperback. As was noted of this widely acclaimed book in Publishers Weekly: "Military historian and aviation enthusiast Makos, along with WWII biographer Alexander...[offer] a top-notch narrative of the unlikely encounter between one of Germany's leading fighter aces, Franz Stigler, and the rookie crew of an American bomber in the frigid skies of Germany in December 1943 --- upon engaging the already damaged American plane, Stigler had mercy on his enemies and escorted them to safety. Building on the events of that encounter, Makos crafts a multifaceted story, relating the career of Stigler from his first taste of combat in North Africa to his final assignment flying jet fighters in the waning battles of the war in Europe. He also follows American Lt. Charlie Brown and his crew through training and to the successful completion of their combat tour in April 1944. Based on thousands of hours of interviews and an evident knowledge of his subject, Makos details the frantic life of the German fighter pilots living on the edge, and the American bomber crews, far from home, fighting to survive. The book is a riveting story of humanity and mercy set against the ghastly backdrop of war."

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