© 2022 Public Radio Tulsa
800 South Tucker Drive
Tulsa, OK 74104
(918) 631-2577

A listener-supported service of The University of Tulsa
PRT Header Color
classical 88.7 | public radio 89.5
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Covering the Local-Food Movement in Green Country: A Chat with the Editor of "Edible Tulsa"

magazine-cover.jpg
Aired on Thursday, November 6th.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Valarie Carter, a classically trained chef, food writer, wine columnist, and catering/events coordinator. She's also the editor of "Edible Tulsa," which is a newly launched bimonthly print publication (accessible online at this link) that celebrates the local food culture of our community and its surrounding environs. The magazine's tag line -- "Eating. Drinking. Thinking. Local." -- pretty much says it all, and so we chat with Carter about the ever-growing local-food movement in and around Green Country, and about how her attractive new publication intends to cover this movement. Also on today's show, we offer another conversation that was recorded recently at the StoryCorps Mobile Booth in downtown Tulsa (at the Guthrie Green). In this entertaining little dialogue, Pamela Rose Scott Vickers interviews her beloved uncle, Frederick Douglass Davis, Sr., about a club that Davis used to own in Tulsa in the 1960s: The Showboat.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
Related Content