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"The Essence of Place: Celebrating the Photography of David Halpern" Now at Gilcrease

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Aired on Thursday, June 1st.

Our guest is the celebrated photographer David Halpern, who was based for many years here in Tulsa and now resides in Santa Fe. A wonderful exhibition of his work -- "The Essence of Place: Celebrating the Photography of David Halpern" -- will be on view at the Gilcrease Museum through the end of this year. As noted of this show at the Gilcrease website: "Though he owes much to photographers like Ansel Adams and Edward Weston, [Halpern's] greater influences come from painters such as Albert Bierstadt and Thomas Moran. When at work, Halpern concentrates less on documenting reality and more on expressing his personal feelings about the subject and how to make them seem relevant. Halpern’s work is informed by his awareness that all environments change over time with the impact of public use, commercial exploitation, and natural phenomena. While he cares deeply about the natural world and believes it is worth protecting, Halpern’s approach is neither sermonic nor adversarial. He prefers to let the images speak for themselves.... [This exhibit] showcases a series of Halpern's photographs depicting the extraordinary landscapes in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Utah." Also, please note that Halpern will be speaking about his work at a "From My Point of View" gathering at Gilcrease tomorrow, Friday the 2nd, beginning at noon.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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