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A Conversation with Angélique Kidjo, the Grammy Award-Winning Beninese Singer-Songwriter

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Aired on Friday, October 20th.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak by phone with Angélique Kidjo, the internationally acclaimed Beninese singer-songwriter and activist, who routinely speaks out for human rights and female empowerment as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador. Named "Africa's premier diva" by Time Magazine and "the undisputed queen of African music" by The Daily Telegraph of London, Kidjo creates infectious music that draws upon Afropop, Caribbean zouk, Congolese rumba, jazz, gospel, and Latin styles; she has collaborated in the recording studio with (to name but a few) Alicia Keys, Bono, and Philip Glass. With UNICEF, Kidjo works to raise awareness for such causes as gender equality, education, and conservation. Next week, on Tuesday the 24th, Kidjo will deliver a free-to-the-public TU Presidential Lecture. This talk begins at 7:30pm in the Renolds Center on the TU campus. (More info is posted on the TU website.)

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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