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From Public Radio Tulsa's John Wooley, a Gripping New Suspense Novel: "Satan's Swine"

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Aired on Wednesday, October 30th.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome John Wooley back to our show. He's well-known for hosting the popular Swing on This western-swing program, which is heard Saturday nights at 7pm here on Public Radio 89.5 FM. He's also a prolific author -- of both faction and nonfiction -- with an array of interests and passions. Wooley joins us to discuss his newest book, just out, which he co-wrote. Inspired by the "pulp" mystery/thriller stories that thrived in American culture in the Twenties through the Forties, "Satan's Swine" is a gripping novel (part 2 of a 3-volume series) set in smalltown Arkansas in 1939. Please note that Wooley will be reading from and signing this book tonight, Wednesday the 30th, at Magic City Books; details are posted here. Also on our show, commentator Mark Darrah questions the logic of (and the naming of) "constitutional carry," which takes effect here in Oklahoma later this week.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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