Manufacturing

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A leading business survey indicates strong growth continuing for the next several months and an economy returning to pre-pandemic levels in 2022.

The Mid-America Business Conditions Index ticked up from 72.3 in May to 73.5 in June. Numbers above 50 on the zero to 100 scale indicate growth. The index hit a record 73.9 in April.

Creighton University economist Ernie Goss oversees the survey and said workers are hard to come by, but manufacturers are hiring.

Here in the good ol' USA, a strong work ethic -- a drive to succeed through hard work -- is seen as a leading virtue, and indeed, as a necessity. We Americans have long been told that financial success and personal well-being will undoubtedly follow if we adopt a highly motivated mindset toward our job. On today's edition of ST, we look at the origins of that "highly motivated" outlook. Our guest is David Gray, a teaching professor of American studies and history at Oklahoma State University.

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A leading indicator for the economy across a nine-state region that includes Oklahoma hit a 30-year high in April.

Creighton University's Mid-America Business Conditions Index climbed five points last month to 73.9. Numbers above 50 on the manufacturing survey’s zero to 100 scale indicate economic growth.

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A regional economic indicator shows strong growth continuing in a nine-state area that includes Oklahoma.

The Mid-America Business Conditions Index hit 69.6 in February, its highest since October and second-highest since April 2004. Numbers above 50 on the 0–100 scale indicate economic growth. Creighton University Economist Ernie Goss said that mark comes as the economy is still another 3% to 4% below pre-COVID levels.

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Manufacturing is off to a strong start in 2021 in a nine-state region that includes Oklahoma.

Creighton University economist Ernie Goss said the Mid-America Business Conditions Index continues to outpace U.S. growth.

"This month, it was a healthy — a very healthy — 67.3, and that’s up from December’s pretty strong 64.1. So, it was a very good reading. We’re still down from pre-COVID levels, but boy, we’re moving in the right direction," Goss said.

(Please note: This interview originally aired back in September.) It's scary, but by now it's also obvious -- our environment today contains thousands (literally, thousands) of toxic chemicals that it did NOT contain just a few decades ago. How are these chemicals affecting our health? And what can we do about this? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the co-author of a new book called "Non-Toxic: Guide to Living Healthy in a Chemical World." Dr.

It's scary, but by now it's also obvious -- our environment today contains thousands (literally, thousands) of toxic chemicals that it did NOT contain just a few decades ago. How are these chemicals affecting our health? And what can we, as individuals, do about this? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the co-author of a new book called "Non-Toxic: Guide to Living Healthy in a Chemical World." Dr. Aly Cohen is a board certified rheumatologist and integrative medicine specialist, as well as an environmental health expert based in Princeton, New Jersey.

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The manufacturing industry in a nine-state region that includes Oklahoma is in good shape, according to a monthly survey.

The Mid-America Business Conditions Index for August was at 60 on a 0 to 100 scale where 50 is growth neutral, higher numbers indicate growth and lower numbers show contraction. It was at 57.4 in July.

There are some factors holding back the manufacturing sector, like a supply bottleneck.

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Things are looking up for manufacturers in a nine-state region that includes Oklahoma.

For July, the Mid-America Business Conditions Index reached its highest level since March 2019, 57.4, up more than seven points from June. Numbers above 50 on the 0–100 scale indicate growth. Creighton University economist Ernie Goss said those two months in positive territory came after three months of contraction.

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The manufacturing sector in a nine-state region that includes Oklahoma is stuck in recession.

That’s according to the Mid-America Business Conditions Index, a monthly survey out of Creighton University. On the 0 to 100 scale where numbers above 50 indicate growth, the index increased from 35.1 in April to 43.5, still down from where it was in March.

Job losses due to COVID-19 are a big part of the problem.

Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum and IC Bus have put their differences behind them for the next two decades.

Bynum, IC Bus and parent company Navistar announced Thursday a new, 20-year agreement for the bus maker to stay at its 1 million-square foot facility at Tulsa International Airport.

Bynum and IC Bus publicly sparred over their lease renewal earlier this month, with IC Bus claiming Bynum was threatening them with eviction and Bynum saying the company hadn’t met maintenance requirements under their previous, $1 lease.

The International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW)

A major labor union has weighed in on the lease showdown between Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum and the IC Bus manufacturing plant.

In a statement from their president, Rory Gamble, the United Auto Workers said that the 1,600 workers at the plant "deserve better than the risky behavior that what [sic] we're currently seeing," and accused Bynum of using the workers as "bargaining chips."

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With the City of Tulsa and IC Bus of Oklahoma sitting down for negotiations over a contested lease on Thursday, the public relations battle continued to rage via the press.

Speaking to reporters Wednesday, Mayor G.T. Bynum forcefully denied allegations made in a press release issued and a P.R. campaign launched by the Illinois-based Navistar, IC Bus's parent company, that Bynum wanted to evict the company from the city-owned facility near the airport.

Google Maps Street View

In a late Tuesday statement, Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum said IC Bus, a major manufacturer in Tulsa, and its parent company, Navistar, are mounting a "false campaign" in accusing City Hall of threatening their facility with eviction.

Under the name "Save Tulsa Jobs," Navistar released a statement saying that "the City of Tulsa is threatening to evict IC Bus from its school bus manufacturing facility at the Tulsa International Airport, a move which would cost the city and the state of Oklahoma 1,600 jobs."

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The Oklahoma Department of Commerce has made $5 million available for grants to help manufacturers affected by the COVID-19 pandemic retool their operations.

"We are repurposing closing funds that we typically use to attract businesses into the state, but we instead want to use those dollars to help existing businesses," said Oklahoma Secretary of Commerce Sean Kouplen.

Grants of $25,000 to $150,000 are available through the Manufacturing Reboot Program to help companies develop new products or expand their current capabilities.