Muscogee Creek Nation

The Muscogee Nation

The Muscogee Nation this week announced a rebranding, centering its public image around "Muscogee" -- not "Creek." 

Organizations Gather to Support Victims of Crime

Apr 23, 2021

The US Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Oklahoma hosted a “Day of Hope” Friday at Tulsa’s Promenade Mall.

The purpose was to pass safety and victim resources to the public. One organization in attendance was Coffee Bunker, a nonprofit advocating for veterans. Coffee Bunker Chaplain Greg Bilbruck said for him the event was about solidarity.

“We’re out here with the United States Attorney’s Office, the Sherriff’s Office, Muscogee Creek Nation. We’re here just to support victims and try to get justice for them,” said Bilbruck.  

Muscogee (Creek) Nation

The Muscogee (Creek) Nation is sending two specialized mobile health units to rural corners of the reservation in an attempt to increase access to the COVID-19 vaccine.

"Our reservation includes urban and rural communites, so we bought these mobile units to reach out into the areas where we might not have a clinic, where there might not be accessibility," said Rhonda Beaver, Muscogee (Creek) Nation Department of Health chief administrative officer. 

"So we're going to areas like Yardeka, we're going to areas like Dustin, Holdenville, to Checotah," Beaver said. 

American Academy of Pediatrics

The Muscogee (Creek) Nation Department of Health is now offering first doses of COVID-19 vaccinations on a first come, first served basis at a drive-thru clinic in Tulsa.

The clinic is Friday and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the River Spirit Expo Center at Tulsa's Expo Square, 4145 E. 21st St. Muscogee (Creek) Nation has 4,000 doses available.

The Muscogee (Creek) Nation Department of Health announced Friday any Oklahoman 18 or older is welcome at a COVID-19 vaccination clinic in Tulsa next weekend.

The 4,000-dose, drive-thru clinic will be March 26 and 27 at the fairgrounds’ River Spirit Expo Center. When it was announced earlier this week, eligibility was limited to Native Americans and their non-Native family members and caregivers.

Whitney Bryen-Oklahoma Watch

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals on Thursday ruled the state did not have jurisdiction to prosecute a former Tulsa police officer who was convicted of manslaughter in 2017 and sentenced to 15 years in prison. 

Former Tulsa officer Shannon James Kepler, 60, is a member of Creek Nation who was convicted of killing his daughter’s boyfriend in Tulsa on land within the historic reservation of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation.

Food and Drug Administration

The Muscogee (Creek) Nation and Indian Health Service will hold a 4,000 dose COVID-19 vaccination clinic in Tulsa next weekend.

Shots will be given March 26 and 27 in a four-lane drive-thru at the fairgrounds’ River Spirit Expo Center.

"So, we’re taking all Native Americans 18 years and older, non-Native American family members and caregivers of the Native household," said Muscogee (Creek) Nation Department of Health Director of Environment of Care and Emergency Management Kami Willis.

Joe Ravi / CC-BY-SA 3.0

Since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in McGirt v Oklahoma that the Muscogee (Creek) Nation reservation was never disestablished, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Oklahoma have seen more than four times as many criminal defendants.

The Muscogee (Creek) Nation Court saw an even bigger increase in cases.

Matt Trotter / KWGS

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt on Friday invited leaders of the Five Tribes of Oklahoma to begin formal negotiations related to last year’s landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling on tribal sovereignty.

Stitt said in a statement he will welcome the leaders of the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole nations to begin discussions “to address and resolve the potential issues that have arisen” as a result of the ruling. Stitt didn’t say when those discussions might begin.

Matt Trotter / KWGS

The Tulsa City Council wants to give the Muscogee (Creek) Nation two more years to decide whether it can commit $16 million dollars to building an Arkansas River Dam near 101st Street.

The deadline for that was Dec. 31 of this year. The council voted last week to extend the deadline to Dec. 31, 2022. Councilor Phil Lakin said the additional time will ensure everyone’s budgets have recovered from 2019’s spring floods and the coronavirus pandemic and will give Tulsa officials time to meet with Muscogee (Creek) officials about the matter.

Oklahoma tribes and U.S. attorneys are the first in the nation to work together in a new federal program to handle missing and murdered indigenous persons cases.

The Muscogee (Creek) and Cherokee nations will take the lead in developing guidelines for local, state and federal agencies to work with them on such cases. The plans will address law enforcement, victim services, community outreach and communication.

Muscogee (Creek) Nation Family Violence Prevention Program Director Shawn Partridge said the program will build on work the tribe has been doing for itself.

File Photo

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — A grocery store chain filed a second lawsuit in Tulsa federal court asking a judge to determine whether one of its stores should be subject to sales tax for the Oklahoma Tax Commission, while also paying sales tax to the Muscogee (Creek) Nation.

Image Credit: The National Judicial College

Earlier this year, in its landmark McGirt v. Oklahoma decision, the United States Supreme Court ruled that, regarding the Major Crimes Act, much of the eastern part of our state remains as Native American land, since that land was never disestablished by Congress. So, how is McGirt playing out now in court rooms and legal offices across Oklahoma? And what does the immediate future hold vis a vis the McGirt ruling? Our guest is Aila Hoss, Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Tulsa College of Law.

Robby Korth / StateImpact Oklahoma

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A task force appointed by Gov. Kevin Stitt made no specific recommendations Thursday in its report concerning the impact of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that declared a swath of eastern Oklahoma counties remains an Indian reservation.

The report calls for consistent laws and regulations in the state governing taxation, zoning and business regulations, which Stitt said will be up to Congress to provide.

Greater Tulsa Area Indian Affairs Commission

The city of Tulsa's fourth annual Native American Day was held remotely Monday due to the coronavirus pandemic, with streaming performances, speeches, presentations and even a virtual vendors' market.

"Four years ago, the Greater Tulsa Area Indian Affairs Commission, Mayor [G.T] Bynum and the city council made a commitment to celebrate and recognize Native America Day each year on the second Monday of each October," said Matt Roberts, the event's emcee. "We appreciate Mayor Bynum's progressive and inclusive leadership."

Music of the Indigenous Peoples of North America

Oct 8, 2020

The Rhythm Atlas Celebrates Indigenous Peoples' Day
Sunday, October 11, 6 - 7 p.m. on KWGS Public Radio 89.5

Facebook / Governor Kevin Stitt

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has approved a request from Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt’s administration to allow the state, not tribal nations, to regulate environmental issues in Indian Country, even those lands that may be inside historical tribal reservation boundaries.

U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Oklahoma

TAHLEQUAH, Okla. (AP) — U.S. Attorney Bill Barr promised more manpower and federal aid to Oklahoma on Wednesday to help tribal governments and federal prosecutors deal with an increase in criminal cases stemming from a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision.

During a visit to the Cherokee Nation headquarters, Barr said the U.S. Department of Justice plans to fund two federal prosecutor positions in the northern and eastern U.S. districts of Oklahoma to handle the increased caseloads.

Oklahoma Department of Corrections

MUSKOGEE, Okla. (AP) — A member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation convicted of murder in state court and another convicted of sexually assaulting a child in cases at the center of a major U.S. Supreme Court ruling on tribal sovereignty are now facing felony charges in federal court, U.S. Attorney Brian Kuester announced on Monday.

A federal grand jury in Muskogee returned criminal indictments against Jimcy McGirt, 71, for three counts of aggravated sexual abuse, and Patrick Dwayne Murphy, 51, for murder and kidnapping.

George Tiger

MUSKOGEE, Okla. (AP) — The former principal chief of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation has been sentenced to one year in prison and fined $10,000 for his role in a bribery scheme, federal prosecutors announced on Thursday.

George Phillip Tiger, 70, of Bristow, pleaded guilty last year in federal court to bribery related to work he did for the Wetumka-based Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town. Tiger was no longer chief at the time prosecutors say he solicited and accepted the bribe.

Chris Polansky / KWGS News

At a Tuesday press conference at the U.S. Attorney's Office in downtown Tulsa, federal, state, municipal and tribal officials said they are all effectively working together to ensure public safety is not negatively impacted as jurisdictional questions are resolved following the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in McGirt v. Oklahoma.

The Board of Tulsa County Commissioners on Monday approved an agreement between the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Lighthorse Police and the Tulsa County Sheriff for law enforcement in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in McGirt v. Oklahoma.

Sheriff Vic Regalado said his deputies will be authorized to enforce laws on Muscogee (Creek) Nation land.

Muscogee (Creek) Nation

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — One day after announcing an agreement in principle with Oklahoma’s attorney general on proposed federal legislation regarding tribal jurisdiction, the leaders of two of five major Native American tribes indicated Friday that they don’t support the deal.

Muscogee (Creek) Nation Principal Chief David Hill and Seminole Nation Chief Greg P. Chilcoat both said they’re not in agreement with the document released Thursday by Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter.

Joe Ravi / CC-BY-SA 3.0

The Muscogee (Creek), Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw and Seminole nations and the State of Oklahoma released an agreement on Thursday to help the state’s congressional delegation write legislation that would settle jurisdictional questions in the wake of last week’s McGirt decision.

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A Native American man convicted in Oklahoma of first-degree murder and another who pleaded guilty to manslaughter had their convictions vacated because the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that much of the eastern part of the state remains a reservation on which tribal members are subject to federal and tribal law, not state law.

Photo From Wikipedia

Yesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a surprising 5-4 decision in the case of McGirt v. Oklahoma; the Court ruled that much of the eastern half of Oklahoma is still an Indian reservation. In doing so, the Court affirmed that -- because Congress had not expressly disestablished the Muskogee Creek Reservation, which was created well over a century ago -- that Reservation still exists when it comes to the Federal Major Crimes Act.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Justice Neil Gorsuch appeared Monday to be a pivotal vote for the proposition that a large chunk of eastern Oklahoma remains an American Indian reservation, a question the Supreme Court failed to resolve a year ago.

The justices heard arguments by phone in an appeal by a Native American man who claims state courts have no authority to try him for a crime committed on reservation land that belongs to the Muscogee (Creek) Nation.

SupremeCourt.gov

The United States Supreme Court on Monday heard oral arguments via phone in the matter of McGirt v. Oklahoma, a case with major ramifications for eastern Oklahoma.

Jimcy McGirt, a member of the Seminole Nation, was convicted of rape and other crimes in an Oklahoma court in 1997. In 2018, McGirt filed a motion arguing that state court was the wrong venue for his trial, as the crime was committed within the boundaries of Muscogee (Creek) Nation, which he claims is still a federally designated reservation and has never been ceded to the state of Oklahoma.

US Supreme Court

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments today in a case that has enormous implications for Oklahoma.

McGirt v. Oklahoma is the second case before the justices within the span of about 18 months that seeks to resolve whether eastern Oklahoma is still legally an Indian reservation and under the jurisdiction of the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek and Seminole nations,  a status that could upend decades of state criminal convictions of tribal citizens.

Tribal leaders from across Oklahoma sent Gov. Kevin Stitt a letter on Friday urging him to issue a shelter in place order for the entire state.

A total of 26 tribal leaders signed the letter, including Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr., Chickasaw Nation Gov. Bill Anoatubby, Choctaw Nation Chief Gary Batton and Muscogee (Creek) Nation Chief David Hill.

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