TU History Department

This coming Friday and Saturday, the 30th and 31st, the Helmerich Center for American Research here in Tulsa will present "Dislocations and Migrations," an interdisciplinary symposium of academics, activists, archivists, curators, librarians, and other experts -- all of them exploring ideas of displacement, departure, arrival, relocation, removal, escape, and so on. Our guest on ST, the journalist Jessica Bruder, will be the keynote speaker at this upcoming gathering.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution. What does this revolution mean to us today? How do remember it; what lessons or themes do we draw from it? And moreover, how is the revolution thought of by Russians themselves? On this edition of ST, we speak with Donald J. Raleigh, a Distinguished Professor of Russian History at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Our guest is Edward Baptist, a professor at Cornell University, who will soon give the 2017 Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture here at TU. (This free-to-the-public event happens on Monday the 6th, beginning at 7pm; you'll find more information here.) Prof.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with two University of Tulsa faculty members about an exciting Woody Guthrie symposium -- entitled "Standing at the Crossroads of American Cultural Life" -- that will happen at TU's Lorton Performance Center on Saturday the 30th. Our guests are Dr. Randall Fuller, the Chapman Professor of English, and Dr. Brian Hosmer, the Barnard Associate Professor of Western American History.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the two Michigan State University professors who will be jointly delivering the Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture in History tonight (Monday the 15th) on the TU campus. The lecture is free to the public; it begins at 7:30pm in Helmerich Hall. Our guests are Lewis H. Siegelbaum and Leslie Page Moch, who are also the co-authors of "Broad Is My Native Land: Repertoires and Regimes of Migration in Russia's Twentieth Century" (Cornell University Press).

On this Veterans Day edition of StudioTulsa, we're talking about a certain classic novel that came out of World War I, "The Four Horsemen of The Apocalypse" by the Spanish author Vicente Blasco Ibáñez, and about a silent-film epic, from 1921, which had the same title, and which was based on this novel -- and which also introduced audiences around the globe to an unknown actor named Rudolph Valentino.

Our guest on ST is Anne Hyde, the William R. Hochman Professor of History at Colorado College. She'll be giving the 2014 H.G. Barnard Distinguished Lecture, which is presented annually by the TU Department of History, tonight (Tuesday the 25th) at the Gilcrease Museum Auditorium here in Tulsa. The lecture begins at the 7pm and is free to the public. Prof. Hyde, who mainly teaches courses on the history of Native America as well as that of North America, received her A.B. degree in American Studies from Mount Holyoke College and her M.A.

Tonight, Thursday the 13th, TU's Department of History will present the Annual Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture here on the University of Tulsa campus; the event begins at 7:30pm in the Tyrrell Hall Auditorium. Our guest on ST is the distinguished academic who will be delivering this free-to-the-public lecture: Professor Norman Naimark is the Robert and Florence McDonnell Chair in East European History at Stanford University. He's also a Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution and the Institute of International Studies.

Our guest on this installment of ST is Dr. Stuart Rockoff, who will give the annual Cadenhead-Settle Lecture --- presented by TU's Department of History every fall --- tomorrow night (Wednesday the 24th) here on the University of Tulsa campus. The lecture will begin at 7pm in the Tyrrell Hall Auditorium; it's entitled "Bagels and Grits: How Jews Found a Home in the South." Dr. Rockoff is Director of the History Department at the Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life in Jackson, Mississippi.

On today's show, we speak with Joshua Piker, an associate professor of history at the University of Oklahoma. Prof. Piker will give the 2012 Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture, which is presented annually by the TU Department of History, on Thursday of this week (the 5th) at 6pm at the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa. His lecture is entitled, "The Four Deaths of Acorn Whistler: Telling Stories on the Colonial American Frontier," and it's based on a book that Prof. Piker is just now completing.