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Closing Soon at Philbrook: "The Works of Fernando and Humberto Campana, 1989-2009"

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On this edition of ST, we listen back to a discussion that first aired in July, when we spoke with Lauren Ross, the Nancy E. Meinig Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. At that time, Philbrook had just opened an exhibition called "Antibodies: The Works of Fernando and Humberto Campana, 1989-2009." That show will close on Sunday the 7th. As Ross explains, the brothers Fernando and Humberto Campana, both born and still based in the massive Brazilian city of Sao Paulo, create whimsical, off-beat, strikingly vibrant, and at times flat-out funny constructions that are works of design as well as works of art. These pieces --- usually meant to be furniture --- are greatly influenced by Brazilian street life and carnival culture, and are notable for their inspired and often novel employment of "found objects" (such as scraps of wire or plastic, pieces of wood or fabric, or even stuffed animals or garden hoses). You can learn more about this interesting art exhibit --- and view examples of the Campana brothers' work --- at the Philbrook website.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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