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Energy is what makes our world go around. These programs are hosted by Jason Bjorn Aamodt and Rick Munoz and are part of the University of Tulsa College of Law’s Master of Jurisprudence in Energy Law program.

Veteran Energy Expert James Clad on "The World Politics of a Changing Energy Landscape"

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Aired on Thursday, June 5th.

On this installment of ST, we offer a discussion of how oil, coal, and other energy sources are influencing today's international geo-politics. Our guest is James Clad, a diversely experienced foreign-affairs and oil-policy expert who consults for various energy and investment firms worldwide. Clad is a senior adviser at the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA) in Arlington, Virginia, as well as an advisor to IHS Jane's and Cambridge Energy Research Associates (CERA). From 2002 to 2010, Clad served as U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Asia, Senior Counselor and Director for Middle Eastern Affairs at the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, and Senior Counselor at the Agency for International Development. He has also been a Professor of Asian Studies at Georgetown University, has written several books, was trained as a lawyer in New Zealand, and has written articles for the Far Eastern Economic Review. Clad was in town earlier this week to address the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations on "The World Politics of a Changing Energy Landscape," and he stopped by our studios while he was here.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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