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The Decline and Fall of a French Emperor -- "Napoleon: The End of Glory"

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Aired on Friday, November 21st.

On this installment of ST, we've got a show for all the history buffs out there. Our guest is author and scholar Munro Price, the Professor of Modern European History at Bradford University in the UK. His newest book, which he discusses with us by phone, is "Napoleon: The End of Glory" (Oxford U. Press). It's a detailed yet accessible account of the final years of Napoleon's life, including the Battle of Nations, the Hundred Days, and of course Waterloo. The years 1813 and 1814 are focused on in particular, when Napoleon gambled with and finally lost his empire -- as well as his control over France itself. Professor Price draws on previously unused archival material from across Europe to shed new light on not only Napoleon, but also on Metternich and other key players of this pivotal moment in European history. As was noted by a critic for Booklist: "Enlivened by pithy character sketches, Price's work trenchantly interprets an important historical issue."

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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