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"The Overparenting Epidemic: Why Helicopter Parenting Is Bad for Your Kids...and Dangerous for You"

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Aired on Monday, December 15th.

Our guest on ST is Dr. George Glass, a longtime Texas-based physician who's also the co-author of "The Overparenting Epidemic: Why Helicopter Parenting Is Bad for Your Kids...and Dangerous for You, Too!" While the notion of "overparenting" or "helicopter parenting" is not really a new concept, what is rather newly and widely apparent is that our society's first generation of overparented children are now becoming adults in their own right. These "millennial" children-turned-grown-ups have been done an injustice, as our guest states today, by their well-meaning but misguided parents...who have so often inappropriately intervened with too much advice, excessive favors, etc. The result, of course, is that all those kids who grew up with parents who negotiated, erased, or "fixed" their problems for them are now doing the same misdeeds for their own kids. Dr. Glass further maintains that America's obsession with providing everything a child could possibly need, from macrobiotic cupcakes to non-stop ballet or karate lessons to 24/7 tutors, has created epidemic levels of depression and stress amid our country's youth. Thus "The Overparenting Epidemic" argues that parents everywhere ought to take a giant step back, check their ambitions at the door, and do what's really best for their kids.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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