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ST on Health: Tulsa County's Drug Recycling Program, a Pioneering Initiative That's Now Quite Common

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Aired on Wednesday, June 24th.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Linda Johnston, the Director of Social Services for Tulsa County. Last month, Johnston spoke briefly with Steve Innskeep of NPR's Morning Edition about the County's Drug Recycling Program, which began in 2004. Through this program, which Johnston helped to create, more than $16 million worth of prescription medicines have been given to the poor...and it's a program that was created at a total cost, as Johnston tells us today, of less than $6,000. Johnston speaks in detail about how the Drug Recycling Program got started, how exactly it works, who thought it up in the first place, and why it took Oklahoma lawmakers seven years to finally approve this now-commonplace program. She also talks about the volunteers and staffers -- many of them retired doctors -- who actually make the program happen.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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