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"The Mad Feast: An Ecstatic Tour Through America's Food"

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Aired on Wednesday, November 18th.

On this edition of ST, an interesting discussion with Matthew Gavin Frank, a Michigan-based writer and creative writing teacher whose past books include "Preparing the Ghost," "Pot Farm," "Barolo (At Table)," and "Sagittarius Agitprop." He joins us to discuss his newest book, a collection of fifty essays that, all in all, offers a full-fledged culinary tour of the United States, with a "signature dish" for each state being described in fascinating and far-reaching detail. It's a "surprising, entertaining look at what Americans eat and why" (Kirkus Reviews) that also has many points to make about nation's our history, politics, traditions, religions, geography, culture, economy, and so on. And further, per a book critic for Entertainment Weekly: "Never has a country-spanning food romp felt this subversive. Frank's essays -- which dissect signature dishes from all 50 states -- are nothing short of brilliant.... [As] an exploration of humanity, life, and tastes, the book is delicious."

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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