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"Rick Bartow: Things You Know But Cannot Explain" at Gilcrease

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Aired on Monday, January 25th.

On this edition of our show, we learn about a new exhibition at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "Rick Bartow: Things You Know But Cannot Explain" will be on view through April 24th. Featuring more than 100 art works, including sculptures, paintings, drawings, prints, mixed media pieces, and the giant pastels for which Bartow is best known, the exhibit draws from both public and private collections -- including the artist's own studio. Further, as noted of this exhibit at the Gilcrease website: "Rick Bartow is one of Oregon's best-known artists. For more than 40 years, he has created a powerful body of work, influenced by his Native American heritage, life experiences, physical environment, international travels, and fine art training. In 2012, two of his monumental sculptures were permanently installed on the National Mall in Washington, DC, outside the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian.... [This] exhibition culminates in outstanding examples of Bartow's most recent work, which evidences a new freedom of scale and expression." Our guest on ST is Charles Froelick, a gallery owner and longtime representative for Bartow's work, who is based in Portland, Oregon, and who spoke with us late last week, when he was in town to lecture at Gilcresae on the life and work of Rick Bartow.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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