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Charles Kupchan on the Future of the Atlantic Partnership

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Aired on Tuesday, May 29th.

Since the end of World War II, the Atlantic Alliance between the countries of Western Europe and the United States has been a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy. Despite various strains over the years, my guest today has said: "We've always argued about the 'means,' not the 'ends,' of policy. Now we seem to want very different end results." He was referring in this comment to the Trump Administration's decision to withdraw from the Iranian nuclear deal, despite near-unanimous European opposition.

Dr. Charles Kupchan, our guest, is a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations; he teaches at Georgetown University's Walsh School of Foreign Service. From 2014 to 2017, he was a special assistant to the President, and also the senior director for European Affairs at the National Security Council, within the Obama Administration. He also served as director for European Affairs at the NSC during the Clinton Administration. 

He was recently a guest of the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations, speaking on "America First: Does the Atlantic Partnership Have a Future?"

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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