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"Recall/Respond" -- A Tulsa Artist Fellowship / Gilcrease Museum Collaboration

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Aired on Friday, June 21st.

Our guests on this edition of ST are Laura Fry, Senior Curator of the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa, and Carolyn Sickles, Executive Dirtector of the Tulsa Artist Fellowship. These two outstanding, arts-based organizations are now jointly offering "Recall/Respond," a contemporary arts exhibition that presents work by current Tulsa Artist Fellows as well as TAF alumni. As noted at the Gilcrease website: "By engaging in conversation with contemporary artists, this exhibition confronts complex histories within the interdisciplinary Gilcrease collections of the art, history, and culture of greater North America. The first phase of 'Recall/Respond: Tulsa Artist Fellowship and Gilcrease Museum Collaboration' opens Friday, June 21, and will remain on view through October 13, 2019. Works include a variety of arts media, such as photography, painting, sculpture, textile, performances, video and outdoor installations."

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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