Chicago

On this edition of ST, we speak with the acclaimed poet and writing instructor Quraysh Ali Lansana (born 1964 in Enid, Oklahoma). Now based in Tulsa and recently named a Tulsa Artist Fellow, Lansana has published several books over the years: poetry collections, children's books, edited or co-edited anthologies, textbooks, etc. Long based in Chicago, and greatly influenced by the African-American cultural, social, and political life of that city -- and more generally, by the Black Arts Movement in American life and letters -- Lansana has a new book out.

Our guest is John Jeter, the longtime Music Director and Conductor of the Fort Smith Symphony. That symphony has a new CD out, which Jeter tells us about. It's a widely acclaimed recording of the work of Florence Price (1887-1953), who was a pioneering African-American classical composer. Indeed, Price, who was originally from Little Rock and spent many years in Chicago, was the first African-American woman to be recognized as a symphonic composer, and the first to have her music played by a major U.S. orchestra.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Jayne Anne Phillips, the acclaimed fiction writer whose previous books include "Black Tickets," "Machine Dreams," and "Lark and Termite." In her newest book, just out in paperback, Phillips both explores and re-imagines a real crime that occurred in 1931, in a West Virginia town not far from where she herself grew up. Phillips tells us of this novel -- called "Quiet Dell" -- on today's program.