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"Influence Is Your Superpower: The Science of Winning Hearts, Sparking Change, and Making Good Things Happen"

Influence is your Superpower bookshot
Aired on Wednesday, May 11th.

"An engaging book on the science of encouraging other people to say yes." -- Adam Grant, host of the TED podcast "WorkLife"

Our guest is Zoe Chance, a writer and teacher whose popular course at the Yale School of Management is the basis for her new book. The course is called Mastering Influence and Persuasion, and the book, which Chance tells us about on today's ST, is "Influence Is Your Superpower: The Science of Winning Hearts, Sparking Change, and Making Good Things Happen." As was noted of the book in a Publishers Weekly review: "The same skills that make a good marketer can help make a positive changemaker, argues [Zoe] Chance in her encouraging debut. Influence, or having 'the ability to create change, direct resources, and move hearts and minds,' she posits, 'is our human advantage' and one that people are born with; here, she suggests ways of using it for good. Her early experience in telephone sales and later career as a marketer taught her to roll with rejection and revealed to her just how much developing charisma and deep listening skills can help convince people to change their minds.... [Her book] covers a wide range of scenarios, from women standing up for themselves to political candidates looking to pick up votes."

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