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Diana Negroponte of The Brookings Institution on How Brazil and Mexico Are Confronting Globalization

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Aired on Monday, March 17th.

On this edition of our show, we are talking about Latin America's two largest economies, those of Mexico and Brazil. Each has experienced much of the turbulence or strife that goes hand in hand, it seems, with globalization --- but each has also enjoyed many of the benefits of this ongoing, open-ended worldwide phenomenon. Our guest today on ST is an expert on such; Dr. Diana Negroponte is a nonresident senior fellow with the Latin America Initiative under the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution. Her work is mainly devoted to research and writing on Latin America, with a particular emphasis on security issues in Mexico and Central America. Previously, Dr. Negroponte was a senior scholar at the U.S. Institute of Peace (and she received her doctorate from Georgetown University with a dissertation that examined efforts to make peace at the end of the Cold War in El Salvador). Earlier this month, Dr. Negroponte gave an address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations entitled "How Are Brazil and Mexico Confronting the Challenges of Globalization?" While she was in town, she stopped by our Public Radio Tulsa studios to discuss this matter. (More on here address at the TCFR can be found here, by the way.)

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