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"Future Crimes: Everything Is Connected, Everyone Is Vulnerable, and What We Can Do About It"

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Aired on Wednesday, March 4th.

Our guest on ST is Marc Goodman, whose still-in-progress professional career has focused on law enforcement and technology; he's served as everything from a street police officer to a senior adviser to Interpol. Goodman is also the author of the highly acclaimed new nonfiction work, "Future Crimes: Everything Is Connected, Everyone Is Vulnerable, and What We Can Do About It." As one reviewer at Amazon.com noted, when that website named "Future Crimes" a Best Book of March 2015: "It won't surprise many people to read that computers, networks, and personal information are under constant attack. Most of us install a commonly available anti-virus program, mind our clicks, and hope for the best. More than that seems like work, and stories of data theft have become so ubiquitous that a certain amount of desensitization is probably inevitable. Well, Goodman's book should take care of that. When your C.V. includes titles like 'futurist-in-residence with the FBI,' you've seen who's creeping through those internet pipes, and it's harrowing; his litany of cyber criminals and their multitudinous misdeeds are often shocking in their inventiveness and audacity, and Goodman brings the nightmares one after another at an almost breathless pace. But not all is hopeless -- Goodman aims to educate, offering from high-level policy to practical layman's advice for buttoning down your own data. Despite the scare factor, it's a fun, fast, and fascinating 400 pages."

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