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The Tulsa City Council's Draft Proposal for Arkansas River Infrastructure Development

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Aired on Wednesday, June 17th.

After some 18 months and a previous series of public meetings, the Tulsa City Council's Arkansas River Infrastructure Task Force now has a draft proposal for funding a series of low-water dams on the Arkansas River. The $298 million proposal calls for three new low-water dam sites as well as a rebuild of the existing Zink Low-Water Dam, a maintenance and operations fund to ensure upkeep of all these facilities, and money for levee rehabilitation. (The levees in Tulsa County have been deemed among the most at-risk in the U.S.) Our guest on ST is the chairman of this Task Force, G.T. Bynum, who is also the City Councilor for District 9. Bynum tells us how this proposal would be funded, who would be doing the funding, and why both development and infrastructure-enhancement of the river in Tulsa, Sand Springs, Jenks, and Bixby are so important to each of these communities. He also tells us that a new round of public meetings are being held on this matter, and that the next such meeting will happen on Monday the 22nd at 6pm at the Rudisill Regional Library (at 1520 N. Hartford Avenue in Tulsa). More about this meeting, and about Tulsa's ongoing river development concerns more generally, can be found at the City Council's River Infrastructure Development Homepage.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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