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"How Leading Organizations Are Upending Business as Usual" (Encore Presentation)

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Aired on Tuesday, May 9th.

On this installment of ST, we listen back to our chat from last fall with David Burkus, a well-respected expert on business and management practices who's also a bestselling author, an in-demand speaker, and an associate professor of management at Oral Roberts University. Burkus joined us in November to discuss his latest book, "Under New Management: How Leading Organizations Are Upending Business as Usual." As was noted of this work by Publishers Weekly: "In this thought-provoking business book, Burkus...asserts that many historical management practices are no longer relevant in today's workplace. In easily readable chapters, he challenges conventional thinking and offers 'redesigned management tools,' writing that they may 'seem odd compared to business as usual, but the truth is that business isn't usual anymore.' Burkus outlines the techniques some companies have introduced to lower stress and increase productivity, such as eliminating internal email, prioritizing employees over customers, allowing unlimited vacation time and employee-designed workspaces, and even doing away with bosses.... Managers looking for ways to engage their workforces and improve productivity will find Burkus's work a helpful guide." Note that you can hear a free, on-demand audio-stream of our conversation with David Burkus at this link.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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