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"The First Tour de France: Sixty Cyclists and Nineteen Days of Daring on the Road to Paris"

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Aired on Friday, July 14th.

On this edition of ST -- with the Tour de France now in full swing -- we learn about both the origins and the development of the greatest race in all of cycling. Our guest is Peter Cossins, who's written about professional cycling since the early 1990s -- and who is a contributing editor at Procycling Magazine. His new book, just out, is called "The First Tour de France: Sixty Cyclists and Nineteen Days of Daring on the Road to Paris." As was noted of this book by a critic for Podium Cafe (a journal of cycling news, analysis, and opinion): "Essential.... [This book] takes you back to the race itself. Cossins produces a deeply researched and detailed description of the race that toggles between background information on the race's organization and the individual stages, with long stretches of real-time-style stage reporting, one chapter at a time. The effect of this, especially the latter, is soaring."

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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