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Contemporary Hybrid Artist Gina Adams on Her Broken Treaty Quilts Project

Yankton-Sioux-Gina-Adams-Quilt.jpg
"Yankton Sioux, 1837" by Gina Adams. (Hand-cut calico letters on antique quilt.) 91.5”H x 72.5”W, 2014. Posted at [www.ginaadamsartist.com/broken-treaty-quilts].
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Aired on Thursday, November 5th.

Our guest on ST is Gina Adams, a contemporary hybrid artist based in Vancouver, British Columbia. She joins us to discuss her striking and ongoing series of Broken Treaty Quilts. A descendant of both Indigenous Peoples (the Ojibwe tribe) and colonial Americans, Adams re-purposes antique quilts in order to create art works documenting the various treaties broken by the United States with Native American tribes over the years. Some of these quilts are now on view at Gilcrease as part of that museum's fine "Weaving History into Art" show (which runs through March 28th, 2021). Also, Adams will give a free presentation about her colorful, powerful, and meticulous Broken Treaty Quilts tomorrow (Friday the 6th) at 1pm on the Zoom platform. (Registration is required; more info is posted here.)

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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