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Why do human beings sweat? And what other animals on this planet sweat, and why do they do it? Are there health benefits to sweating? Our guest is Sarah Everts, a science writer who has written for Scientific American, Smithsonian, New Scientist, and other publications, and who teaches journalism at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada.

Here in the good ol' USA, a strong work ethic -- a drive to succeed through hard work -- is seen as a leading virtue, and indeed, as a necessity. We Americans have long been told that financial success and personal well-being will undoubtedly follow if we adopt a highly motivated mindset toward our job. On today's edition of ST, we look at the origins of that "highly motivated" outlook. Our guest is David Gray, a teaching professor of American studies and history at Oklahoma State University.

There are many, many different skin-care products out there...and keeping skin healthy has long been a booming industry...but how did we get here? And why are there so many confusing messages from health experts regarding the care of our skin? Why are there so many ineffective treatments? Our guest is a preventative medicine physician and staff writer for The Atlantic whose new book explains the surprising (and often unintended) effects of our modern-day hygiene practices; his book also offers an introduction to the new science of skin microbes and probiotics.

Our guest is Dr. Vinayak K. Prasad, a practicing hematologist-oncologist and internal medicine physician based in San Francisco. He joins us to discuss his important new book, "Malignant: How Bad Policy and Bad Evidence Harm People with Cancer." This work explains how hype, money, and bias can -- and often do -- mislead the public into thinking that many worthless or unproven cancer treatments are effective. As noted by Dr. David P.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we're talking about a large and impressive exhibit on view at Crystal Bridges Museum over in Bentonville, Arkansas, through January 1st. This far-reaching show -- entitled "Stuart Davis: In Full Swing," and offering, per The New York Times, "a universe of jazzy patterns and blazing colors" -- profiles the long career of an influential American artist who consistently and creatively made images from the early 1900s through the early 1960s.

Our guest is James Peterson, the James Beard Award-winning food writer, cookbook author, photographer, and cooking teacher who started his career as a restaurant cook in Paris in the 1970s. He's written more than a dozen cooking guides and recipe books over the years, including "Sauces," "Fish & Shellfish," "Meat: A Kitchen Education," and "Cooking." His newest book, just out, is called "Done.: A Cook's Guide to Knowing When Food Is Perfectly Cooked," and Peterson joins us today to discuss this volume.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome Paul Davis, who grew up in Tulsa and then left for NYC (at age 17 or so) to study at the School of Visual Arts, and who, since the early 1960s, has been a highly regarded and quite recognizable illustrator and graphic artist. Just after his time in art school, Davis worked at the commercial art powerhouse known as Push Pin Studios --- and the theatrical posters that he created, mainly in the 1980s and 1990s, for The New York Shakespeare Festival for plays like "Three Penny Opera" and "Hamlet" are today seen as classics.